Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-888d5979f-g6cgc Total loading time: 0.252 Render date: 2021-10-26T06:52:03.440Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Article contents

Intraspecific Variations of Morphology and Physiology of Temperate to Arctic Populations of Cetraria Nivalis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 March 2007

B. Schipperges
Affiliation:
Institut für Polarökologie der Universität Kiel, Wischhofstr. 1–3, Gebäude 12, D-24148 Kiel, Germany
L. Kappen
Affiliation:
Institut für Polarökologie der Universität Kiel, Wischhofstr. 1–3, Gebäude 12, D-24148 Kiel, Germany
M. Sonesson
Affiliation:
Abisko Scientific Research Station, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, S–98107 Abisko, Sweden.

Abstract

Five populations of the circumpolar Arctic-alpine lichen species Cetraria nivalis were sampled along a latitudinal gradient from the temperate to the Arctic climatic zone. The populations were compared with respect to their CO2 exchange, water relations and morphology/anatomy. Provenances from places along this latitudinal gradient were transplanted in 1983/84 to a site near the Scientific Research Station in Abisko, to see whether they are identical with plastic acclimation ability or whether they represent different ecotypes. The five populations represent two major geographical groups, a ‘southern’ and a ‘northern’ one, with respect to some morphological and anatomical features, chlorophyll content and water relations. The transplanted C. nivalis provenances showed a tendency towards increasing net photosynthetic rates with origin in the higher latitudes. The CO2 exchange response of the native populations was the reverse of this tendency although CO2 exchange was in general flexible. It is concluded that the investigated C. nivalis populations were different ecotypes because of genetic differences and a distinct seasonal plasticity. The ecotypes are interpreted as a result of isolation in different refugia during the Pleistocene.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © British Lichen Society 1995

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
4
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Intraspecific Variations of Morphology and Physiology of Temperate to Arctic Populations of Cetraria Nivalis
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Intraspecific Variations of Morphology and Physiology of Temperate to Arctic Populations of Cetraria Nivalis
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Intraspecific Variations of Morphology and Physiology of Temperate to Arctic Populations of Cetraria Nivalis
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *