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Human Rights in the International Court of Justice

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 December 2007

Abstract

In this speech delivered at the conference honouring Professor Dugard, President Higgins discusses various human rights issues that have come before the International Court of Justice, including self-determination, reservations to human rights treaties, the application of human rights instruments to occupied territories, and allegations of genocide by one state against another. President Higgins notes that in the past few decades the ICJ has been joined by regional human rights courts, commissions and treaty monitoring bodies. Similar human rights claims are surfacing in these diverse fora, but the acknowledged expertise of these specialist bodies and the desire to avoid fragmentation provide an impetus for all concerned to seek common solutions on evolving points of law.

Type
"ESSAYS IN HONOUR OF JOHN DUGARD: THE PROTECTION OF THE INDIVIDUAL IN INTERNATIONAL LAW"
Copyright
© 2007 Foundation of the Leiden Journal of International Law

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