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Studies of high energy density in matter driven by heavy ion beams in solid targets

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 February 2003

E. DEWALD
Affiliation:
GSI Darmstadt Plasma Physics, D-64291 Darmstadt, Germany
C. CONSTANTIN
Affiliation:
Technische Universität Darmstadt, IKP, D-64289 Darmstadt, Germany
S. UDREA
Affiliation:
Technische Universität Darmstadt, IKP, D-64289 Darmstadt, Germany
J. JACOBY
Affiliation:
Technische Universität Darmstadt, IKP, D-64289 Darmstadt, Germany
D.H.H. HOFFMANN
Affiliation:
Technische Universität Darmstadt, IKP, D-64289 Darmstadt, Germany
C. NIEMANN
Affiliation:
Technische Universität Darmstadt, IKP, D-64289 Darmstadt, Germany
J. WIESER
Affiliation:
Technische Universität Darmstadt, IKP, D-64289 Darmstadt, Germany
N.A. TAHIR
Affiliation:
Universität Frankfurt, Physics Department, Frankfurt, Germany
A. KOZYREVA
Affiliation:
Technische Universität Darmstadt, IKP, D-64289 Darmstadt, Germany
A. SHUTOV
Affiliation:
Institute of Chemical Physics Research, Chernogolovka, Russia
A. TAUSCHWITZ
Affiliation:
Technische Universität Darmstadt, IKP, D-64289 Darmstadt, Germany

Abstract

By the interaction of intense (1010 particles/500 ns) relativistic (∼300 MeV/amu) heavy ion beams with solid targets, large volumes (several cubic millimeters) of strongly coupled plasmas are produced at solid-state densities and temperatures of up to 1 eV, with relevance for equation-of-state (EOS) studies of matter at high energy density and heavy ion-beam-driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The time and space profile of the ion beams, focused by the plasma lens to diameters of a minimum of 0.5 mm in order to obtain specific energy depositions of up to about 4 kJ/g, were measured to calculate the energy deposition in the target. In the present work, the plasmas created by ion beam interaction with cryogenic gas crystals and metallic targets are studied, among other methods, by backlighting shadowgraphy and electrical conductivity measurements. The experiments are coupled with two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2002 Cambridge University Press

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