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Effects of helium buffer gas on the atomic carbon nuclear-pumped laser at low power densities

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2009

A. K. Chung
Affiliation:
Fusion Research Laboratory, Nuclear Engineering Program, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri 65211

Abstract

A computer model has been developed and benchmarked for the nuclear-pumped atomic carbon laser. Experiments have been performed with the atomic carbon laser and with the radiolysis of CO2 as a benchmark for the model. The results of the CO2 radiolysis are described.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1991

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Effects of helium buffer gas on the atomic carbon nuclear-pumped laser at low power densities
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