Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-dkwk2 Total loading time: 0.358 Render date: 2021-08-03T12:08:15.980Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Transnational policy and ‘authenticity’ discourses on Romani language and identity

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 June 2015

Yaron Matras
Affiliation:
School of Arts, Languages and Cultures University of Manchester, Oxford Road, M13 9PL, UKyaron.matras@manchester.ac.uk
Corresponding

Abstract

Romani is a fascinating test case for the role that language plays in the process of identity consolidation in a transnational context. Standardisation is no longer inherently connected to the ‘territorialisation’ of language. Instead, we witness a bottom-up process in which individuals take ownership of language and negotiate language practices. Status regulation and language planning can be instigated and even implemented by institutions other than national states. All of this leads to pluralism of form rather than unification. Yet language remains a key locus for political mobilisation. It allows players to claim authenticity, it offers opportunities for intervention by external facilitators, and it provides a discussion platform through which traditional images can be challenged and recognition can be awarded. (Romani, language planning, standardization, language policy, transnationalism)*

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Anderson, Benedict (1983). Imagined communities: Reflections on the origin and spread of nationalism. London: Verso.Google Scholar
Androutsopoulos, Jannis (2013). Code-switching in computer-mediated communication. In Herring, Susan C., Stein, Dieter, & Virtanen, Tuija (eds.), Pragmatics of computer-mediated communication, 667–94. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton.Google Scholar
Appadurai, Arjun (1992). Global ethnoscapes: Notes and queries for a transnational anthropology. In Fox, R. G. (ed.), Interventions: Anthropologies of the present, 191210. Santa Fe, NM: School of American Research.Google Scholar
Aydıngün, Ayşegü, & Aydıngün, İsmail (2004). The role of language in the formation of Turkish national identity and turkishness. Nationalism and Ethnic Politics 10:415–32.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Baker, Colin (1992). Attitudes and language. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Blommaert, Jan (2005). Discourse: A critical introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Courthiade, Marcel (1992). Research and action group on Romani linguistics. Interface 8:411.Google Scholar
Crowley, Tony (2003). Standard English and the politics of language. London: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Crowley, Tony (2007). Language endangerment, war and peace in Ireland and Northern Ireland. In Duchêne, Alexandre & Heller, Monica (eds.), Discourses of endangerment, 149–68. London: Continuum.Google Scholar
Eckert, Penelope (2003). Sociolinguistic and authenticity: An elephant in the room. Journal of Sociolinguistics 7:392431.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Edwards, John (2006). Language and identity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Fairclough, Norman (1989). Language and power. Harlow: Longman.Google Scholar
Fishman, Joshua A.; Ferguson, Charles A.; & Dasgupta, Jyotirindra (eds.) (1968). Language problems in developing nations. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
Carmen, Fought (2006). Language and ethnicity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Giles, Howard, & Johnson, Patricia (1987). Ethnolinguistic identity theory: A social psychological approach to language maintenance. International Journal of the Sociology of Language 68:6999.Google Scholar
Halwachs, Dieter W. (2011). Romani, language planning and the media. Current Issues in Language Planning 12(3):381401.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Halwachs, Dieter W. (2012). Linguistic diversity, dominated languages and the internet: The case of Romani. In Parshakova, Anastasia (ed.), Linguistic and cultural diversity in cyberspace: Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference, 272–81. Paris: UNESCO.Google Scholar
Halwachs, Dieter W.; Schrammel-Leber;, Barbara & Klinger, Simone A. (2013). Romani, education, segregation and the European Charter for Regional and Minority Languages. Graz: Grazer Romani Publikationen.Google Scholar
Hancock, Ian F. (1991). Vlax phonological divergence from common Romani: Implications for standardization and orthography. In Boltz, William G. & Shapiro, Michael C. (eds.), Studies in the historical phonology of Asian languages, 102–18. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hancock, Ian F. (2000). The emergence of Romani as a koïné outside of India. In Kenrick, Donald & Acton, Thomas (eds.), Scholarship and the Gypsy struggle: Commitment in Romani studies, 113. Hatfield: University of Hertfordshire Press.Google Scholar
Hancock, Ian F. (2002). We are the Romani people. Ame sam e Rromane džene. Hatfield: University of Hertfordshire Press.Google Scholar
Hancock, Ian F. (2006). On Romany origins and identity: Questions for discussion. In Marsh, Adrian & Strand, Elin (eds.), Gypsies and the problem of identities: Contextual, constructed and contested, 6992. Istanbul: Swedish Research Institute.Google Scholar
Hancock, Ian F. (2010a). Danger! Educated Gypsy: Selected essays. Hatfield: University of Hertfordshire Press.Google Scholar
Hancock, Ian F. (2010b). Mind the doors! The contribution of linguistics. In Le Bas, & Acton, , 525.Google Scholar
Herring, Susan C. (2008). Virtual community. In Given, Lisa M. (ed.), Encyclopedia of qualitative research methods, 920–21. Los Angeles, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Hughes, Philippa (2013). Language and the representation of Romani identity on websites. RomIdent Working Papers 23. Online: http://romani.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/virtuallibrary/librarydb//web/files/pdfs/378/Paper23.pdf.Google Scholar
Jaffe, Alexandra (1999). Ideologies in action: Language politics on Corsica. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Joseph, John E. (2004). Language and identity: National, ethnic, religious. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kaplan, Robert B., & Baldauf, Richard B. (1997). Language planning from practice to theory. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Kenrick, Donald (1996). Romani literacy at the crossroads. International Journal of the Sociology of language 119:109–23.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kuzar, Rom (2001). Hebrew and Zionism: A discourse analytic cultural study. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Le Bas, Damien, & Acton, Thomas (eds.) (2010). All change! Romani studies through Romani eyes. Hatfield: University of Hertfordshire Press.Google Scholar
Lee, Ronald (2005). Learn Romani: Das-duma Rromanes. Hatfield: University of Hertfordshire Press.Google Scholar
Lee, Ronald (2010). Romani dictionary: Kalderash-English. Hatfield: University of Hertfordshire Press.Google Scholar
Leggio, Danielle V. (2013). Lace avilen ko radio: Romani language and identity on the internet. Manchester: University of Manchester dissertation.Google Scholar
Leggio, Danielle V., & Matras, Yaron (2013). Social networks as centres of language codification: Romani on YouTube. RomIdent Working Papers 32. Online: http://romani.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/virtuallibrary/librarydb//web/files/pdfs/388/Paper32.pdf.Google Scholar
Marsh, Adrian R. N. (2008). ‘No promised land’: History, historiography and the origins of the Gypsies. London: University of Greenwich dissertation.Google Scholar
Matras, Yaron (1999). Writing Romani: The pragmatics of codification in a stateless language. Applied Linguistics 20:481502.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Matras, Yaron (2002). Romani: A linguistic introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Matras, Yaron (2004). A conflict of paradigms. Review article of Zoltan Barany, The East-European Gypsies; and Ian Hancock, We are the Romani people. Romani Studies 5(14–2):193209.Google Scholar
Matras, Yaron (2005a). The status of Romani in Europe. Report commissioned by the Council of Europe's Language Policy Division, October 2005.Google Scholar
Matras, Yaron (2005b). The future of Romani: Toward a policy of linguistic pluralism. Roma Rights Quarterly 1:3144.Google Scholar
Matras, Yaron (2010). Romani in Britain: The afterlife of a language. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Matras, Yaron (2013). Scholarship and the politics of Romani identity: Strategic and conceptual issues. European Yearbook of Minority Issues 10:209–45.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Matras, Yaron, & Reershemius, Gertrud (1991). Standardization beyond the state: The case of Yiddish, Kurdish and Romani. In von Gleich, Utta & Wolff, Ekkehardt (eds.), Standardization of national languages, 103–23. Hamburg: UNESCO-Institut für Pädagogik.Google Scholar
Milroy, James (2001). Language ideologies and the consequences of standardization. Journal of Sociolinguistics 5:530–55.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rajah-Carrim, Aaliya (2009). Use and standardisation of Mauritian Creole in electronically mediated communication. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 14:484508.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rheingold, Howard (1993). The virtual community: Homesteading on the electronic frontier. New York: Rutledge.Google Scholar
Skutnabb-Kangas, Tove, & Phillipson, Robert (eds.) (1994). Linguistic human rights: Overcoming linguistic discrimination. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
Spolsky, Bernard (2003). Language policy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wright, Sue (2004). Language policy and language planning: From nationalism to globalisation. New York: Palgrave McMillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Transnational policy and ‘authenticity’ discourses on Romani language and identity
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Transnational policy and ‘authenticity’ discourses on Romani language and identity
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Transnational policy and ‘authenticity’ discourses on Romani language and identity
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *