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Sprouting traits of Fagaceae species in a hill dipterocarp forest, Ulu Gadut, West Sumatra

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 December 2010

Sen Nishimura*
Affiliation:
Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwake, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto606–8502, Japan
Tsuyoshi Yoneda
Affiliation:
Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065, Japan
Shinji Fujii
Affiliation:
University of Human Environments, Okazaki, Aichi 444–3505, Japan
Erizal Mukhtar
Affiliation:
Faculty of Science Andalas University, Padang, West Sumatra, Indonesia
Mamoru Kanzaki
Affiliation:
Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwake, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto606–8502, Japan
Seiichi Ohta
Affiliation:
Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwake, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto606–8502, Japan
*
1Corresponding author. Current address: Matsushiro, Tsukuba 305-0035, Japan. Email: sennishi01@gmail.com

Extract

The size distribution of a tree species gives important information about its regeneration strategy. For example, a tree species that regenerates primarily by sprouting will, in theory, have fewer seedlings than species that regenerate from seedlings, which generally form an L-shaped population size structure because of trade-offs in resource allocation between vegetative sprouting and sexual reproduction (Bellingham & Sparrow 2000, Loehle 2000). The results of some field studies suggest that the number of seedlings decreases with increasing dominance of multi-stemmed sprouters (Kruger et al. 1997, Zimmerman et al. 1994). In their study of four co-occurring species of Castanopsis (Fagaceae), Nanami et al. (2004) showed that species with a high frequency of sprouting adults had fewer juveniles and vice versa. This suggested that these species were able to co-exist as a result of trade-offs between investment in seedlings and sprouting. In this study, we investigated the sprouting trait of 17 co-occurring Fagaceae species in a Sumatran hill forest. The forest stand at this site shows a varied population structure across species, and hence, should have a varied life history. We tested the correlation between population skewness and proportion of sprouting trees, following the methods of Nanami et al. (2004). We hypothesized that the species that frequently form multi-stemmed sprouts will show a lower turnover of individuals because multi-stemmed architecture favours persistence (Bellingham & Sparrow 2009).

Type
Short Communication
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010

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References

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