Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5cfd469876-phsm7 Total loading time: 0.251 Render date: 2021-06-25T01:33:09.216Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

The influence of environmental variables on bdelloid rotifers of the genus Rotaria in Thailand

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 March 2021

Rapeepan Jaturapruek
Affiliation:
Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Chatuchak, Bangkok, 10900, Thailand
Diego Fontaneto
Affiliation:
Molecular Ecology Group (MEG), Water Research Institute (IRSA), National Research Council of Italy (CNR), Verbania Pallanza, Italy
Supiyanit Maiphae
Affiliation:
Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Chatuchak, Bangkok, 10900, Thailand
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

This research investigates the influence of environmental parameters that are known to affect bdelloid rotifer species richness and composition in temperate zones on the genus Rotaria in tropical zone. Our study analysed species richness and composition of the genus Rotaria from 390 samples collected from several types of aquatic habitats in Thailand. Coordinates, elevation, limnological parameters such as water temperature, conductivity, total dissolved solids, salinity, dissolved oxygen and pH were measured. A total of nine species was recorded. Of these, one species, Rotaria macrura (Ehrenberg, 1832), was a new record for Thailand and new to the oriental region, and was a yet undescribed species, Rotaria sp. The species diversity of this genus increased from eight to 10 species. The presence or absence of the genus Rotaria was significantly influenced by dissolved oxygen and habitat type. For the samples where the genus occurred, species richness was not affected by any of the limnological or bioclimatic variables. Differences in species composition were affected only by habitat type. The results support former suggestions that common abiotic parameters do not seem to strongly influence diversity in bdelloids, whereas major ecological differences between habitats influence bdelloid occurrence.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Bērziņš, B and Pejler, B (1987) Rotifer occurrence in relation to pH. Hydrobiologia 147, 107116.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bērziņš, B and Pejler, B (1989) Rotifer occurrence in relation to oxygen content. Hydrobiologia 183, 165172.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bivand, R, Keitt, T and Rowlingson, B (2017) rgdal: Bindings for the ‘Geospatial’ Data Abstraction Library. R package version 1.2-16. https://CRAN.R-project.org/package=rgdal.Google Scholar
Bohonak, AJ and Jenkins, DG (2003) Ecological and evolutionary significance of dispersal by freshwater invertebrates. Ecology Letters 6, 783796.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cohen, GM and Shurin, JB (2003) Scale-dependence and mechanisms of dispersal in freshwater zooplankton. Oikos 103, 603617.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Colwell, RK and Coddington, JA (1994) Estimating terrestrial biodiversity through extrapolation. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society (Series B) 345, 101118.Google ScholarPubMed
Crawley, M (2012) The R Book. 2nd edition. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Donner, J (1965) Ordnung Bdelloidea (Rotifera, Rädertiere). Bestimmungsbücher zur Bodenfauna Europas. Berlin: Akademie Verlag.Google Scholar
Fenchel, T and Finlay, BJ (2004) The ubiquity of small species: patterns of local and global diversity. BioScience 54, 777784.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fick, SE and Hijmans, RJ (2017) Worldclim 2: new 1-km spatial resolution climate surfaces for global land areas. International Journal of Climatology 37, 43024315.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fischer, JM, Frost, TM and Ives, AR (2001) Compensatory dynamics in zooplankton community responses to acidification: measurement and mechanisms. Ecological Applications 11, 10601072.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fontaneto, D (2019) Long-distance passive dispersal in microscopic aquatic animals. Movement Ecology 7, 10.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fontaneto, D and De Smet, WH (2015) Rotifera. In Schmidt-Rhaesa, A (ed.), Handbook of Zoology: Gastrotricha, Cycloneuralia and Gnathifera, Volume 3, Gastrotricha and Gnathifera. Berlin: De Gruyter, pp. 217300.Google Scholar
Fontaneto, D, Ficetola, GF, Ambrosini, R and Ricci, C (2006) Patterns of diversity in microscopic animals: are they comparable to those in protists or in larger animals? Global Ecology and Biogeography 15, 153162.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fontaneto, D, Westberg, M and Hortal, J (2011) Evidence of weak habitat specialisation in microscopic animals. PLoS ONE 6(8), e23969.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fontaneto, D, Barbosa, AM, Segers, H and Pautasso, M (2012) The ‘rotiferologist’ effect and other global correlates of species richness in monogonont rotifers. Ecography 35, 174182.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fontaneto, D, Iakovenko, N and De Smet, WH (2015) Diversity gradients of rotifer species richness in Antarctica. Hydrobiologia 761, 235248.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fox, J and Sanford, W (2011) An {R} Companion to Applied Regression. 2nd edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. http://socserv.socsci.mcmaster.ca/jfox/Books/Companion.Google Scholar
García-Roger, EM, Serra, M and Carmona, MJ (2014) Bet-hedging in diapausing egg hatching of temporary rotifer populations – a review of models and new insights. International Review of Hydrobiology 99, 96106.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Herzig, A (1987) The analysis of planktonic rotifer populations: a plea for long-term investigations. Hydrobiologia 147, 163180.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hijmans, RJ (2017) raster: Geographic Data Analysis and Modeling. R package version 2.6-7. Retrieved from https://CRAN.R-project.org/package=raster.Google Scholar
Jaturapruek, R, Fontaneto, D, Meksuwan, P, Pholpunthin, P and Maiphae, S (2018) Planktonic and periphytic bdelloid rotifers from Thailand reveal a species assemblage with a combination of cosmopolitan and tropical species. Systematics and Biodiversity 16, 128141.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kaczmarek, Ł, Roszkowska, M, Fontaneto, D, Jezierska, M, Pietrzak, B, Wieczorek, R, Poprawa, I, Kosicki, JZ, Karachitos, A and Kmita, H (2019) Staying young and fit? Ontogenetic and phylogenetic consequences of animal anhydrobiosis. Journal of Zoology 309, 111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Keddy, PA (2010) Wetland Ecology: Principles and Conservation. 2nd edition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Koste, W and Shiel, RJ (1986) Rotifera from Australian Inland Waters. I. Bdelloidea (Rotifera: Digononta). Australian Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research 37, 765792.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kuczyńska-Kippen, N (2018) The use of bdelloids in reference to rotifer biocoenotic indices as an indicator of the ecological state of small field water bodies: the effect of macrophytes, shading and trophic state of water. Ecological Indicators 89, 576583.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Maiphae, S, Pholpunthin, P and Dumont, HJ (2005) Species richness of the Cladocera (Branchiopoda: Anomopoda and Ctenopoda) in southern Thailand, and its complementarity with neighboring regions. Hydrobiologia 537, 147156.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McCune, B and Mefford, MJ (2016) PC-ORD. Multivariate Analysis of Ecological Data. Version 7.0 for Windows. Corvallis, OR: Wild Blueberry Media. https://bmccune.weebly.com/software.html.Google Scholar
Obertegger, U, Thaler, B and Flaim, G (2010) Rotifer species richness along an altitudinal gradient in the Alps. Global Ecology Biogeography 19, 895904.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Oksanen, J, Blanchet, FG, Friendly, M, Kindt, R, Legendre, P, McGlinn, D, Minchin, PR, O’Hara, RB, Simpson, GL, Solymos, P, Stevens, MHH, Szoecs, E and Wagner, H (2017) vegan: Community Ecology Package. R package version 2.4-5. https://CRAN.R-project.org/package=vegan.Google Scholar
Pejler, B (1995) Relation to habitat in rotifers. Hydrobiologia 313/314, 267278.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pejler, B and Bērziņš, B (1993) On choice of substrate and habitat in bdelzoid rotifers. Hydrobiologia 255/256, 333338.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pourriot, R and Snell, TW (1983) Resting eggs in rotifers. Hydrobiologia 104, 213224.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
R Core Team (2017) R: A Language and Environment for Statistical Computing. Vienna: R Foundation for Statistical Computing. Retrieved from https://www.R-project.org/.Google Scholar
Ricci, C (1987) Ecology of bdelloids: how to be successful. Hydrobiologia 147, 117127.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ricci, C (1992) Rotifers: parthenogenesis and heterogony. In Dallai, R (ed.), Sex Origin and Evolution. Mucchi, Modena: Selected Symposia and Monographs UZI, pp. 329341.Google Scholar
Ricci, C (2001) Dormancy patterns in rotifers. Hydrobiologia 446, 111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ricci, C and Melone, G (2000) Key to the identification of the genera of bdelloid rotifers. Hydrobiologia 418, 7380.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sa-ardrit, P, Pholpunthin, P and Segers, H (2013) A checklist of the freshwater rotifer fauna of Thailand (Rotifera, Monogononta, Bdelloidea). Journal of Limnology 72(s2), 361375.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Segers, H (2007) Annotated checklist of the rotifers (Phylum Rotifera), with notes on nomenclature, taxonomy and distribution. Zootaxa 1564, 1104.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Setapan, Y (1999) Geography of Thailand. 2nd edition. Bangkok: Pisit Publ.Google Scholar
Sládeček, V (1983) Rotifers as indicators of water quality. Hydrobiologia 100, 169201.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Song, MO and Lee, C-H (2019) Four new bdelloid rotifers from Korea. Zootaxa 4571, 201224.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wallace, RL, Snell, TW, Ricci, C and Nogrady, T (2006) Rotifera, Volume 1: Biology, Ecology and Systematics . In Dumont, HJF (ed.), Guides to the Identification of the Microinvertebrates of the World. Ghent: Kenobi Productions, pp. 1299.Google Scholar
Wolda, H (1981) Similarity indices, sample size and diversity. Oecologia 50, 296302.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Supplementary material: File

Jaturapruek et al. supplementary material

Jaturapruek et al. supplementary material 1

Download Jaturapruek et al. supplementary material(File)
File 51 KB
Supplementary material: File

Jaturapruek et al. supplementary material

Jaturapruek et al. supplementary material 2

Download Jaturapruek et al. supplementary material(File)
File 12 KB

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The influence of environmental variables on bdelloid rotifers of the genus Rotaria in Thailand
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The influence of environmental variables on bdelloid rotifers of the genus Rotaria in Thailand
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The influence of environmental variables on bdelloid rotifers of the genus Rotaria in Thailand
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *