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MtDNA diversity of the Indonesian giant barrel sponge Xestospongia testudinaria (Porifera: Haplosclerida) – implications from partial cytochrome oxidase 1 sequences

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 September 2015

Edwin Setiawan
Affiliation:
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Palaeontology & Geobiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany Zoology lab, Biology Department, Mathematic and Natural Science Faculty, Sepuluh November Institute of Technology, Surabaya, Indonesia Naturalis Biodiversity Center, Leiden, the Netherlands
Nicole J. de Voogd*
Affiliation:
Naturalis Biodiversity Center, Leiden, the Netherlands
Thomas Swierts
Affiliation:
Naturalis Biodiversity Center, Leiden, the Netherlands
John N.A. Hooper
Affiliation:
Biodiversity Program, Queensland Museum, South Brisbane, Australia Eskitis Institute for Drug Discovery, Griffith University, Nathan, Queensland 4111, Australia
Gert Wörheide
Affiliation:
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Palaeontology & Geobiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany GeoBio-CenterLMU Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany SNSB – Bayerische Staatssammlung für Paläontologie und Geologie, Munich, Germany
Dirk Erpenbeck*
Affiliation:
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Palaeontology & Geobiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany GeoBio-CenterLMU Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany
*
Correspondence should be addressed to:N.J. de Voogd and D. Erpenbeck, Naturalis Biodiversity Center, Leiden, the Netherlands; Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Palaeontology & Geobiology, and GeoBio-Center, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany email: nicole.devoogd@naturalis.nl, erpenbeck@lmu.de
Correspondence should be addressed to:N.J. de Voogd and D. Erpenbeck, Naturalis Biodiversity Center, Leiden, the Netherlands; Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Palaeontology & Geobiology, and GeoBio-Center, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany email: nicole.devoogd@naturalis.nl, erpenbeck@lmu.de

Abstract

The Indonesian archipelago is a ‘hotspot’ for invertebrate biodiversity (‘Coral Triangle’). In this area of ‘peak’ biodiversity, the origins of this high species diversity have often been debated. Xestospongia testudinaria is one of the sponge species that dominates coral reef sponge communities in this region. The role of the so-called ‘giant barrel sponge’ for the reef ecosystem has been studied repeatedly, as have its various bioactive compounds. However, the genetic variation of this iconic sponge in the region remains unknown. We investigate over 200 barrel sponge samples from Indonesia, and neighbouring as well as more distant localities (Saudi Arabia, Tanzania, Thailand, Taiwan, Java, Sulawesi and the Great Barrier Reef, Australia) using the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1. We compare our results with those from the studies on the congeneric barrel sponges Xestospongia muta from the Caribbean, and Xestospongia bergquistia from the Indo-Pacific, and observe a high degree of overlapping haplotypes between the three barrel sponge species, likely indicating the presence of ancestral polymorphisms. We discuss the implications of these findings to better interpret the phylogeography of barrel sponge taxa in the Indo-Pacific.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 2015 

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MtDNA diversity of the Indonesian giant barrel sponge Xestospongia testudinaria (Porifera: Haplosclerida) – implications from partial cytochrome oxidase 1 sequences
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