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Semantic memory and reading abilities: A case report

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2009

Lisa Cipolotti
Affiliation:
National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London, WCIN 3BG, United Kingdom
Elizabeth K. Warrington
Affiliation:
National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London, WCIN 3BG, United Kingdom

Abstract

We document the unexpected dissociation of preserved reading skills in a patient with severely impaired semantic memory. The common co-occurrence between impairment of word meaning and surface dyslexia has not been observed. The patient (hereafter called DRN) had marked naming and word comprehension difficulties. A strong word frequency effect was observed on tests of word comprehension but was absent in a test of word reading. DRN's ability to read both regular and exception words that he failed to comprehend was remarkably well preserved. We will argue that these findings provide further support for the independence of semantic and phonological processing. (JINS, 1995, I, 104–110.)

Type
Case Report
Copyright
Copyright © The International Neuropsychological Society 1995

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