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Frontal lobe contributions to recognition and recall: Linking basic research with clinical evaluation and remediation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 March 2006

PATRICK S. R. DAVIDSON
Affiliation:
The Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
ANGELA K. TROYER
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
MORRIS MOSCOVITCH
Affiliation:
The Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Department of Psychology, Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Abstract

The role of the human frontal lobes in episodic memory is becoming better understood, thanks mainly to focal lesion and neuroimaging studies. Here we review some recent findings from basic research on the frontal lobes in memory encoding, search, and decision-making at retrieval. For each of these processes, researchers have uncovered cases in which frontal memory impairments can be attenuated by various task manipulations. We suggest ways in which these findings may inform clinical evaluation and rehabilitation of memory problems following frontal damage. (JINS, 2006, 12, 210–223.)

Type
SYMPOSIUM
Copyright
© 2006 The International Neuropsychological Society

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Frontal lobe contributions to recognition and recall: Linking basic research with clinical evaluation and remediation
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