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Cognitive phenotypes in temporal lobe epilepsy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 December 2006

BRUCE HERMANN
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin
MICHAEL SEIDENBERG
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, Illinois
EUN-JEONG LEE
Affiliation:
Rehabilitation Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin
FONG CHAN
Affiliation:
Rehabilitation Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin
PAUL RUTECKI
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin

Abstract

The objective of this study is to determine if distinct cognitive phenotypes could be identified in temporal lobe epilepsy. Epilepsy patients (n = 96) and healthy controls (n = 82) underwent comprehensive neuropsychological assessment. Adjusted (age, gender, and education) test scores for epilepsy subjects were grouped into cognitive domains (intelligence, language, visuoperception, immediate and delayed memory, executive function, and cognitive/psychomotor speed). Cluster analysis revealed three distinct cognitive profiles types: (1) minimally impaired (47% of subjects); (2) memory impaired (24%); and (3) memory, executive, and speed impaired (29%). The three cluster groups exhibited different patterns of results on demographic, clinical epilepsy, brain volumetrics, and cognitive course over a 4-year interval. The specific profile characteristics of the identified cognitive phenotypes are presented and their implications for the investigation of the neurobehavioral complications of epilepsy are discussed. (JINS, 2007, 13, 12–20.)

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2007 The International Neuropsychological Society

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