Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-7wlv9 Total loading time: 0.211 Render date: 2022-05-21T20:21:24.042Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Cognitive estimation in traumatic brain injury

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 August 2007

NOAH D. SILVERBERG
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada
ROBIN A. HANKS
Affiliation:
Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Neuropsychology, Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan, and Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan
CHERISSE MCKAY
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada

Abstract

The present study explores the construct and ecological validity of the Biber Cognitive Estimation Test (BCET) in a traumatic brain injury (TBI) sample. Participants completed the BCET in the course of a neuropsychological evaluation at 1–15 years after injury. BCET scores correlated moderately with other standard measures of executive functioning, and contrary to our hypotheses, at least as high with neuropsychological tests with minimal demands on executive functioning. Moreover, partialing out the portion of BCET variance not attributable to executive functioning markedly attenuated the former correlations. With respect to ecological validity, BCET scores did not predict concurrent functional status, as measured by the Disability Rating Scale. By comparison, standard measures of executive functioning strongly correlated with each other, correlated less strongly with nonexecutive functioning measures, and predicted functional status. In conclusion, unlike standard measures of executive functioning, the BCET demonstrated poor construct and ecological validity in TBI patients.(JINS, 2007, 13, 898–902.)

Type
BRIEF COMMUNICATION
Copyright
2007 The International Neuropsychological Society

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Axelrod, B.N. & Millis, S.R. (1994). Preliminary standardization of the cognitive estimation test. Assessment, 1, 269274.Google Scholar
Benton, A., Hamsher, K. deS., Varney, N.R., & Spreen, O. (1983). Contributions to neuropsychological assessment. New York: Oxford University Press.
Brand, M., Kalbe, E., Fujiwara, E., Huber, M., & Markowitsch, H.J. (2003). Cognitive estimation in patients with probable Alzheimer's disease and alcoholic Korsakoff patients. Neuropsychologia, 41, 575584.Google Scholar
Bullard, S.E., Fein, D., Gleeson, M.K., Tischer, N., Mapou, R.L., & Kaplan, E. (2004). The Biber Cognitive Estimation Test. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 19, 835846.Google Scholar
Chaytor, N. & Schmitter-Edgecombe, M. (2003). The ecological validity of neuropsychological tests: A review of the literature on everyday cognitive skills. Neuropsychological Review, 13, 181197.Google Scholar
Delis, D.C., Kaplan, E., & Kramer, J.H. (2001). Delis-Kaplan executive functioning system. San Antonio, TX: The Psychological Corporation.
Delis, D.C., Kramer, J.H., Kaplan, E., & Ober, B.A. (2000). California Verbal Learning Test-Second Edition: Adult version. San Antonio, TX: The Psychological Corporation.
Denckla, M.B. (1996). Research on executive function in a neurodevelopmental context: Application of clinical measures. Developmental Neuropsychology, 12, 515.Google Scholar
Gillespie, D.C., Evans, R.I., Gardener, E.A., & Bowen, A. (2002). Performance of older adults on tests of cognitive estimation. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 24, 286293.Google Scholar
Hanks, R.A., Rapport, L.J., Millis, S.R., & Deshphande, S.A. (1999). Measures of executive functioning as predictors of functional ability and social integration in a rehabilitation sample. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 80, 10301037.Google Scholar
Heaton, R.K., Chelune, G.J., Talley, J.L., Kay, G.C., & Curtiss, G. (1993). Wisconsin Card Sorting Test Manual: Revised and expanded. Lutz, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources, Inc.
Jackson, C.T. (2002). Validation of the Biber Cognitive Estimation Test for person with schizophrenia involved in vocational rehabilitation program. Dissertation, University of Connecticut, Hartford.
Liss, M., Fein, D., Bullard, S., & Robins, D. (2000). Cognitive estimation in individuals with pervasive developmental disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 30, 613618.Google Scholar
Miyake, A., Friedman, N.P., Emerson, M.J., Witzki, A.H., & Howerter, A. (2000). The unity and diversity of executive functions and their contribution to complex “frontal lobe” tasks: A latent variable analysis. Cognitive Psychology, 41, 49100.Google Scholar
The Psychological Corporation. (1997). Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (3rd Ed.). San Antonio, TX: The Psychological Corporation.
Rappaport, M., Hall, K.M., Hopkins, K., Belleza, T., & Cope, D.N. (1982). Disability rating scale for severe head trauma: Coma to community. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 63, 118123.Google Scholar
Reitan, R. & Wolfson, D. (1985). The Halstead-Reitan Neuropsychological Test Battery: Theory and clinical interpretation. Tuscon, AZ: Neuropsychology Press.
Shallice, T. & Evans, M.E. (1978). The involvement of the frontal lobes in cognitive estimation. Cortex, 14, 293303.Google Scholar
Sherer, M., Novack, T.A., Sander, A.M., Struchen, M.A., Alderson, A., & Thompson, R.N. (2002). Neuropsychological assessment and employment outcome after traumatic brain injury: A review. Clinical Neuropsychologist, 16, 157178.Google Scholar
Shretlen, D.J. (1992). Accounting for variance in long-term recovery from traumatic brain injury with executive abilities and injury severity. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 14, 77.Google Scholar
13
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Cognitive estimation in traumatic brain injury
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Cognitive estimation in traumatic brain injury
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Cognitive estimation in traumatic brain injury
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *