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33 Associations Between Long-Term Forgetting and Slow Wave Activity in Autosomal-Dominant Alzheimer’s Disease: Findings from the Colombia-Boston (COLBOS) Biomarker Study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 December 2023

Daisy T Noriega*
Affiliation:
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
Ana Baena
Affiliation:
Universidad de Antioquia, Medellin, Colombia.
Diana Munera
Affiliation:
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
Enmanuelle Pardilla-Delgado
Affiliation:
Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
Paula Aduen
Affiliation:
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
Clara Vila-Castelar
Affiliation:
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
Stephanie Langella
Affiliation:
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
Liliana Ramirez-Gomez
Affiliation:
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
Celina Pluim
Affiliation:
Boston University, Boston, MA, USA.
Eric M Reiman
Affiliation:
Banner Alzheimer’s Institute, Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Francisco Lopera
Affiliation:
Universidad de Antioquia, Medellin, Colombia.
Alice D Lam
Affiliation:
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
Yakeel T Quiroz
Affiliation:
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
*
Correspondence: Daisy T. Noriega, Massachusetts General Hospital, dtnoriega@mgh.harvard.edu
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Abstract

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Objective:

Sleep contributes to memory retention and recall. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients experience decreased slow wave activity (SWA) during sleep. This decrease in SWA is associated with impaired memory consolidation (Lee et al., 2020). Long-term forgetting (LTF) over days or weeks has been linked to memory consolidation deficits and has been suggested as an early marker of AD that could be useful for identifying at-risk individuals for preclinical AD trials (Weston et al., 2018). Here, we examined associations between LTF and SWA in a sample of Presenilin-1 (PSEN1) E280A mutation carriers with autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease and non-carrier family members. Carriers of this mutation usually develop dementia in their forties (Fuller et al., 2019).

Participants and Methods:

Fourteen cognitively unimpaired PSEN1-E280A mutation carriers and sixteen age-matched non-carriers (mean age: 34.2 years) from the Colombia-Boston (COLBOS) biomarker study were included. Participants completed an overnight polysomnogram (PSG) and memory testing (NEUROPSI Word List) at 3-time points: 1) the night before PSG: immediate recall (Day1-ImmRecall) and a 20-minute delayed recall (Day1-DelayedRecall), 2) recall the following day (Day2-recall), and 3) recall one week later (Day7-recall). SWA was measured as the ratio 0. 6-1Hz/0.6-4Hz in frontopolar and frontotemporal regions and was calculated for sleep stages N2+N3 (slow wave sleep) based on an automated staging algorithm. Each participant’s LTF was calculated as the percent retention between Day 1 immediate recall and Day 7 recall (Butler, 2009). Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare differences in recall, SWA, and LTF between groups. Spearman’s correlation was used to examine the associations between memory recall at different time points and SWA, as well as between LTF and SWA.

Results:

On Day 1, carriers had lower performance in immediate recall (p=0.02), compared to non-carriers, but there were no group differences in the 20-minute delayed recall. Carriers also recalled fewer words on Day 2 (p=0.03) and Day 7 (p=0.009) and had greater LTF (p=0.03). There were no group differences in SWA. In our overall sample, worse performance on word list delayed recall on Day 1, Day 2, and Day 7 was associated with less SWA across both frontotemporal (Day1: p=0.04, Day2: p=0.02, Day7: p=0.02) and frontopolar (all Ps<0.01) regions. In carriers, only worse performance on Day 1 delayed recall was associated with lower SWA in the frontopolar region (r= 0.535; p=0.049). Memory recall on other days was not associated with SWA in any brain regions. Additionally, greater LTF was associated with less SWA across both frontopolar (r= 0.507; p=0.005) and frontotemporal regions (r= 0.463 p= 0.01).

Conclusions:

Preliminary findings suggest that long-term forgetting is associated with less slow- wave activity in preclinical autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease. These results also suggest that SWA may be related to pre-sleep learning and subsequent overnight memory consolidation processes. LTF testing may be useful in selecting individuals for preclinical AD trials. Future research on the impact of slow wave activity on LTF may be useful in identifying ways to enhance short- and long-term memory consolidation in individuals at greater risk for dementia.

Type
Poster Session 10: Late Breaking Science
Copyright
Copyright © INS. Published by Cambridge University Press, 2023