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A Pliocene record of Capromeryx (Mammalia: Antilocapridae) in México

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 May 2016

E. Jiménez-Hidalgo
Affiliation:
1Universidad del Mar, Campus Puerto Escondido, Km 3.5 Carretera Puerto Escondido-Oaxaca, Puerto Escondido, 71980 Oaxaca, México
O. Carranza-Castañeda
Affiliation:
2Centro de Geociencias, UNAM, Juriquilla, Querétaro 76230, México
M. Montellano-Ballesteros
Affiliation:
3Instituto de Geología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán 04510, D. F. México

Abstract

The Antilocapridae was a diverse artiodactyl family present in some late Tertiary faunas of North America. In México, its Tertiary fossil record is poorly known. The antilocaprid material described in this paper was collected from the early Blancan fluvial deposits of the San Miguel de Allende Area, state of Guanajuato, México. It includes isolated upper and lower premolars and molars, dental series, and some rami fragments. The material is assigned to Capromeryx tauntonensis. The presence of this species in the early Pliocene of central México represents the oldest record in North America and extends its known geographic distribution from the northwestern United States to central México.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Paleontological Society 

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A Pliocene record of Capromeryx (Mammalia: Antilocapridae) in México
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