Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-564cf476b6-lwxm7 Total loading time: 0.293 Render date: 2021-06-18T19:02:18.189Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Northeast Pacific record of the Paleogene genus Pseudoperissolax (Neogastropoda: Muricidae: Muricinae) and its paleobiogeography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 November 2015

Richard L. Squires
Affiliation:
Department of Geological Sciences, California State University, Northridge, California 91330-8266, USA Research Associate, Invertebrate Paleontology, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, Los Angeles, California 90007, USA <richard.squires@csun.edu>
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

The geologic record of the shallow-marine gastropod genus Pseudoperissolax Clark, 1918 is documented in detail for the first time in a region of the northeast Pacific extending from southwestern Washington to northern Baja California, Mexico. This genus, which has been erroneously equated with the nomen dubium Perrisolax Gabb, 1861, comprises a very small group of species whose supra-generic ranking has been inconsistent. Pseudoperissolax is placed here in family Muricidae Rafinesque, 1815 and subfamily Muricinae Rafinesque, 1815 based on the presence of varices, a club-shaped last whorl with noded carinae, and a long siphonal canal. The genus is represented in the northeast Pacific by the late Paleocene Pseudoperissolax tricarnatus (Weaver, 1905) and the late Paleocene to late Eocene Pseudoperissolax blakei (Conrad, 1855).

Pseudoperissolax was a warm-water gastropod that most likely originated during the Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) in Madagascar and also questionably spread during this time to southern New Zealand. Its certain geologic range is early Paleocene to earliest Oligocene, with occurrences in western Kamchatka, southern Japan, southwestern Washington, southwestern Oregon, southern California, northern Baja California, Mexico, southern Alabama, and Nuevo León, northeastern Mexico. Whether Pseudoperissolax migrated into the northeast Pacific from Kamchatka or from Alabama and Mexico cannot be determined with certainty. The decline and eventual extinction of the genus coincided with the global-cooling event at the end of the Eocene.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © 2015, The Paleontological Society 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Aldrich, T.H., 1895, New or little known Tertiary Mollusca from Alabama and Texas, p. Bulletins of American Paleontology, v. 1, p. 5583.Google Scholar
Anderson, F.M., and Hanna, G.D., 1925, Fauna and stratigraphic relations of the Tejon Eocene at the type locality in Kern County, California: Occasional Papers of the California Academy of Sciences, v. 11, p. 1249.Google Scholar
Barco, A., Claremont, M., Reid, D.G., Houart, R., Williams, S.T., Cruaud, C., Couloux, A., and Oliverio, M., 2010, A molecular phylogenetic framework for the Muricidae, a diverse family of carnivorous gastropods: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, v. 56, p. 10251039.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Beu, A.G., and Maxwell, P.A., 1990, Cenozoic Mollusca of New Zealand: New Zealand Geological Survey Paleontological Bulletin, v. 58, p. 1518.Google Scholar
Boss, K.J., 1982, Mollusca, in Parker, S.P., ed., Synopsis and Classification of Living Organisms: New York, McGraw-Hill, p. 10921096.Google Scholar
Bouchet, P., and Rocroi, J.-P., 2005, Classification and nomenclator of gastropod families: Malacologia, v. 47, p. 1397.Google Scholar
Brown, R.W., 1956, Composition of Scientific Words: Baltimore, Maryland, Private publication, 882 p.Google Scholar
Clark, B.L., 1918, The San Lorenzo series of middle California: University of California Publications: Bulletin of the Department of Geology, v. 11, p. 45234.Google Scholar
Clark, B.L., 1929, Stratigraphy and Faunal Horizons of the Coast Ranges of California, with Illustrations of Index Fossils of Tertiary Horizons: Berkeley, California, Private publication, 30 p.Google Scholar
Clark, B.L., 1938, Fauna from the Markley Formation (upper Eocene) on Pleasant Creek, California: Bulletin of the Geological Society of America, v. 49, p. 683730.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clark, B.L., and Vokes, H.E., 1936, Summary of marine Eocene sequence of western North America: Bulletin of the Geological Society of America, v. 47, p. 851878.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Collignon, M., 1951, Le Crétacé Supérieur d’Antonibe. Couches de passage du Crétacé au Tertiaire: Annales Géologiques du Service des Mines Fascicule, v. 19, p. 75145.Google Scholar
Conrad, T.A., 1855, Report on the fossil shells collected in California by Wm. P. Blake, geologist of the expedition under the command of Lieutenant R. S. Williamson, United States Topographical Engineers, in Preliminary Geological Report of W. P. Blake: U.S. 33rd Congress, 1st session, House Executive Document 129, Appendix, Palaeontology, Article 1, p. 5–20 (no plates), p. 5–20. [Reprinted 1909, U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 59, p. 163–171].Google Scholar
Conrad, T.A., 1857, Descriptions of the fossil shells collected in California, in Williamson, R.S., Report of Explorations in California for Railroad Routes: U.S. 33rd Congress, 2nd session, Senate Executive Document 78 and House Executive Document 91, vol. 5, pt. 2, Appendix 2, Article 2, p. 317–329. [Pacific Rail Road Reports].Google Scholar
Cox, L.R., 1960, General characteristics of Gastropoda, in Moore, R.C., ed., Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology, Pt. I, Mollusca 1: Lawrence, Geological Society of America and University of Kansas Press, p. I85I169.Google Scholar
Cuvier, G.L.C., 1797, Tableau Elémentaire de l’Historie Naturelle des Animaux [des Mollusques]: Paris, Baudonin, 710 p.Google Scholar
Davies, A.M., 1935, Tertiary Faunas, a Text-book for Oilfield Paleontologists and Students of Geology, Revised in 1971 by Eames, F.E., 1, London, George Allen and Unwin, 571 p.Google Scholar
Devyatilova, A.D., and Volobueva, V.I., 1981, Atlas of Neogene Fauna of the Northeast USSR: Central Combined Thematic Expedition of the Northeast Industrial Geological Society, Moscow, 219 p. [In Russian].Google Scholar
Dickerson, R.E., 1914, Fauna of the Martinez Eocene of California: University of California Publications: Bulletin of the Department of Geology, v. 8, p. 61180.Google Scholar
Dickerson, R.E., 1915, Fauna of the type Tejon: its relation to the Cowlitz phase of the Tejon Group of Washington: Proceedings of the California Academy of Sciences, Series 4, 5, p. 3398.Google Scholar
Dockery, D. III, 1986, Punctuated succession of Paleogene mollusks in the northern Gulf Coastal Plain: Palaois, v. 1, p. 582589.Google Scholar
Durham, J.W., 1944, Megafaunal zones of the Oligocene of northwestern Washington: University of California Publications Bulletin of the Department of Geological Sciences, v. 27, p. 101212.Google Scholar
Finlay, H.J., and Marwick, J., 1937, The Wangaloan and associated molluscan faunas of Kaitangata-Green Island Subdivision: New Zealand Department of Scientific and Industrial Research, Geological Survey Branch, Palaeontological Bulletin, v. 15, p 140.Google Scholar
Gabb, W.M., 1861, Synopsis of the Mollusca of the Cretaceous formation, including the geographical and stratigraphical range and synonymy: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, C. Sherman & Son, p. 1201. [Reprinted in Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, 8, p. 57–257 (1862)].Google Scholar
Gabb, W.M., 1864, Description of the Cretaceous fossils, section 4, in Palaeontology of California, v. 1: Geological Survey of California, p. 57–236.Google Scholar
Gardner, J., 1939, Notes on the fossils from the Eocene of the Gulf province, 2., the gastropod familes Cassididae, Ficidae, and Buccinidae: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 193–B, p. 21–37.Google Scholar
Gardner, J., 1945, Mollusca of the Tertiary formations of northeastern Mexico: Geological Society of America Memoir, v. 11, p. Xi + 1–332.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Garvie, C.L., 1991, Two new species of Muricinae from the Cretaceous and Paleocene of the Gulf Coastal Plain, with comments on the genus Odontopolys Gabb, 1860: Tulane Studies in Geology and Paleontology, v. 24, p. 8792.Google Scholar
Givens, C.R., 1974, Eocene molluscan biostratigraphy of the Pine Mountain area, Ventura County, California: University of California Publications in Geological Sciences, v. 109, p. 1107.Google Scholar
Givens, C.R., and Kennedy, M.P., 1979, Eocene molluscan stages and their correlation, San Diego area, California, in Abbott, P.L., ed., Eocene Depositional Systems: San Diego, California, Los Angeles, Pacific Section, Society of Economic Paleontologists and Mineralogists, p. 8195.Google Scholar
Gladenkov, Y.B., 2012, North Pacific molluscan assemblages and paleogeography in the early Paleogene: Austrian Journal of Earth Sciences, v. 105, p. 6871.Google Scholar
Gladenkov, Y.B., and Sinel’nikova, V.N., 2014, Stratigraphy and mollusks of lower Paleogene of the Kamchakta Peninsula and climatic features: Stratigraphy and Geological Correlation, v. 22, p. 4460.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gordon, W.A., 1973, Marine life and ocean surface currents in the Cretaceous: Journal of Geology, v. 81, p. 269284.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gradstein, F.M., Ogg, J., Schmitz, M.D., and Ogg, G.M., 2012, The Geologic Time Scale 2012: Amsterdam, Elsevier, 1144 p.Google Scholar
Groves, L.T., Filkorn, H.F., Squires, R.L., and Johnson, K.G., 2003, Notice of transfer of the California State University, Northridge, Paleontology Collection to the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County: Journal of Paleontology, v. 77, p. 408.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hanna, G.D., and Hertlein, L.G., 1941, Characteristic fossils of California, in Jenkins, O.P., ed., Geologic Formations and Economic Development of the Oil and Gas Fields of California, part 2, Geology of California and the Occurrence of Oil and Gas: State of California Division of Mines, Bulletin, 118, p. 165178.Google Scholar
Harris, G.D., 1896, The Midway stage: Bulletins of American Paleontology, v. 1, p. 116270.Google Scholar
Harris, G.D., 1897, New and interesting Eocene Mollusca from the Gulf states: Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, v. 48, p. 470482.Google Scholar
Harris, G.D., 1899, The Lignitic stage, part 2, Scaphopoda, Gastropoda, Pteropoda and Cephalopoda: Bulletins of American Paleontology, v. 3, p. 1129.Google Scholar
Honda, Y., 1990, Paleogene molluscan biogeography of Japan, Suito Ho-on Kai Special Publication 3: Proceedings of Shallow Tethys 3, Sendai, v. 1990, p. 489506.Google Scholar
ICZN 1999, International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature, fourth ed., the International Trust for Zoological Nomenclature, London, Natural History Museum, 306 p.Google Scholar
Javidpour, M., 1973, Some records on west American Cenozoic gastropods of the genus Aforia: The Veliger, v. 15, p. 196205.Google Scholar
Leitão, A., Vasconcelos, P., Ben-Hamadou, R., Gaspar, M.B., Barroso, C.M., and Ruano, F., 2009, Cytogenetics of Bolinus branderis and phlyogenetic inferences within the Muricidae (Mollusca: Gastropoda): Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, v. 96, p. 185193.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lightfoot, J., 1786, A Catalogue of the Portland Museum, Lately the Property of the Duchess Dowager of Portland: London, Anonymously printed, 194 p.Google Scholar
Link, H.F., 1807, Beschreibung der Naturalien-Smmlung der Universität zu Rostock: Rostock, Germany, A. Erben, 160 p.Google Scholar
Linnaeus, C., 1758, Systema Naturae per Regna Tria Naturae, editio décima reformata: Stockholm, Laurentius Salvius, 1, 824 p.Google Scholar
Makiyama, J., 1957, Matajiro Yokoyama’s Tertiary fossils from various localities in Japan, pt. 1: Palaeontological Society of Japan, v. 3, p. 14.Google Scholar
Merle, D., Garrigues, B., and Pointier, J.-P., 2011, Fossil and recent Muricidae of the world: part Muricinae: Hackenheim, Germany, Conchbooks, 652 p.Google Scholar
Moore, E.J., 1968, Fossil mollusks of San Diego County: San Diego Society of Natural History Occasional Paper, 15, iv +1–76 p.Google Scholar
Myers, B.W., and Hertz, C.M., 1994, A new species of Bolinus (Gastropoda: Muricidae) from the Caribbean: The Veliger, v. 37, p. 201203.Google Scholar
Nagao, T., 1928, Palaeogene fossils of the Island of Kyushu, Japan: The Science Reports of Tôhoku Imperial University, Sendai, Japan, Series 2 (Geology), v. 12, p. 11140.Google Scholar
Nilsen, T.H., 1973, Facies relations in the Eocene Tejon Formation of the San Emigdio and western Tehachapi Mountains, California, in Fischer, P., ed., Sedimentary Facies Changes in Tertiary Rocks California Transverse and Southern Coast Ranges: Annual Meeting AAPG, SEPM, SEG, SEPM Trip 2, p. 7–23.Google Scholar
Nilsen, T.H., 1987, Stratigraphy and sedimentology of the Eocene Tejon Formation, western Tehachapi and San Emigdio mountains, California: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1268, vii + 1–110 p.Google Scholar
Oleinik, A.E., 1998, Paleogene biostratigraphy, biogeography, paleoclimates and molluscan paleontology of the Kamchatka Peninsula [Ph.D. dissertation]: West Lafayette, Indiana, Purdue University, 747 p.Google Scholar
Oleinik, A.E., 2001, Eocene gastropods of western Kamchatka–implications for high-latitude north Pacific biostratigraphy and biogeography: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, v. 166, p. 121140.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Oleinik, A.E., and Marincovich, L. Jr., 2003, Biotic response to the Eocene-Oligocene transition: Gastropod assemblages in the high-latitude north Pacific, in Prothero, D.R., Ivany, L.C., and Nesbitt, E.A., eds., From Greenhouse to Icehouse, The Marine Eocene-Oligocene Transition: New York, Columbia University Press, p. 3656.Google Scholar
Oyama, K., and Mizuno, A., 1958, On the new forms of Paleogene molluscs from Japan: Bulletin of the Geological Survey of Japan, v. 9, p. 589606.Google Scholar
Oyama, K., Mizuno, A., and Sakamoto, T., 1960, Illustrated handbook of Japanese Paleogene molluscs: Geological Survey of Japan, 244 p.Google Scholar
Palmer, K.V.W., and Brann, D.C., 1966, Catalogue of the Paleocene and Eocene Mollusca of the southern and eastern United States, part 2, Gastropoda: Bulletins of American Paleontology, v. 48, p. 4711027.Google Scholar
Paredes-Mejia, L.M., 1989, Late Cretaceous-Early Cenozoic stratigraphy and paleontology (Mollusca: Gastropoda) of the Sepultura Formation, Mesa San Carlos, Baja California Norte, Mexico [M.S. thesis]: Lafayette, Indiana, Purdue University, 527 p.Google Scholar
Ponder, W.F., and Vokes, E.H., 1988, A revision of the Indo-West Pacific fossil and recent species of Murex s. S. and Haustellum (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Muricidae): Records of the Australian Museum, Supplement, 8, p. 1160.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pusch, G.G., 1837, Polens Paläontologie oder Abbildung und Beschreibung: Stuttgart, E. Schweizerbart’s Verlagshandlung, 218 p.Google Scholar
Radwin, G.E., and D’Attilio, A., 1976, Murex shells of the World, An Illustrated Guide to the Muricidae: Stanford, California, Stanford University Press, 284 p.Google Scholar
Rafinesque, C.S., 1815, Analyse de la Nature ou Tableau de l’Universe et des Corps Organisées: Palermo, Barravecchia, 223 p.Google Scholar
Saul, L.R., 1988, Latest Cretaceous and early Tertiary Tudiclidae and Melongenidae (Gastropoda) from the Pacific slope of North America: Journal of Paleontology, v. 62, p. 880889.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schenck, H.G., and Keen, M., 1940, California Fossils for the Field Geologist, preliminary ed.,: Palo Alto, California, Privately published, 86 p.Google Scholar
Schumacher, H.C.F., 1817, Essais d’un Nouveau Système des vers Testaces: Copenhagen, Schultze, 287 p.Google Scholar
Shimer, H.W., and Shrock, R.R., 1944, Index Fossils of North America: Cambridge, Massachusetts, MIT Press, 837 p.Google Scholar
Smith, A.G., Smith, D.G., and Funnel, B.M., 1994, Atlas of Mesozoic and Cenozoic Coastlines: Cambridge, Massachusetts, Cambridge University Press, 99 p.Google Scholar
Smith, J.T., 1975, Age, correlation, and possible Tethyan affinities of mollusks from the Lodo Formation of Fresno County, California, in Weaver, D.W., Hornaday, G.R., and Tipton, A., eds., Paleogene Symposium & Selected Technical Papers: American Association of Petroleum Geologists, Society of Economic Paleontologists and Mineralogists, and Society of Exploration Geologists, Annual Meeting, Long Beach, California, p. 464–483.Google Scholar
Squires, R.L., 1984, Megapaleontology of the Eocene Llajas Formation, Simi Valley, California: Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, Contributions in Science, v. 350, p. 176.Google Scholar
Squires, R.L., 1987, Eocene molluscan paleontology of the Whitaker Peak area, Los Angeles and Ventura counties, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County: Contributions in Science, v. 388, p. 193.Google Scholar
Squires, R.L., 1988, Rediscovery of the type locality of Turritella andersoni and its geologic age implications for west coast Eocene strata, in Filewicz, M.V., and Squires, R.L., eds., Paleogene Stratigraphy: West Coast of North America, Pacific Section, SEPM, 58, p. 203208.Google Scholar
Squires, R.L., 2003, Turnovers in marine gastropod faunas during the Eocene-Oligocene transition, west coast of the United States, in Prothero, D.R., Ivany, L.C., and Nesbitt, E.A., eds., From Greenhouse to Icehouse, The Marine Eocene-Oligocene Transition: New York, Columbia University Press, p. 1435.Google Scholar
Squires, R.L., 2011, Northeast Pacific Cretaceous record of Pyropsis (Neogastropoda: Pyropsidae) and paleobiogeography of the genus: Journal of Paleontology, v. 85, p. 11991215.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Squires, R.L., and Goedert, J.L., 1995, New species of middle Eocene gastropods from the northern Doty Hills, southwestern Washington: The Veliger, v. 38, p. 254269.Google Scholar
Stanton, T.W., 1896, The faunal relations of the Eocene and Upper Cretaceous on the Pacific coast: U.S. Geological Survey Annual Report, 17, pt. 1, p. 1011–1060.Google Scholar
Stewart, R.B., 1927, Gabb’s California fossil type gastropods: Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, v. 78, p. 287447.Google Scholar
Stewart, R.B., 1930, Gabb’s California Cretaceous and Tertiary type lamellibranches: The Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia: Special Publications, v. 3, p. 1314.Google Scholar
Stilwell, J.D., 1993, New early Paleocene Mollusca from the Wangaloa Formation of South Island, New Zealand: Journal of Paleontology, v. 67, p. 360369.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Suzuki, K., and Ito, T., 1946, A few new facts on the geological age of the Tertiary of the southern Kii Peninsula: Journal of the Geological Society of Japan, v. 52, p. 1821. [In Japanese].CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tegland, N.M., 1933, The fauna of the type Blakeley upper Oligocene of Washington: University of California Publications Bulletin of the Department of Geological Sciences, v. 23, p. 81174.Google Scholar
Toulmin, L.D., 1977, Stratigraphic distribution of Paleocene and Eocene fossils in the eastern Gulf Coast region, 1: Geological Survey of Alabama, Monograph 13, 602 p.Google Scholar
Turner, F.E., 1938, Stratigraphy and Mollusca of the Eocene of western Oregon: Geological Society of America Special Paper, v. 10, 130 p.Google Scholar
Vokes, H.E., 1939, Molluscan faunas of the Domengine and Arroyo Hondo formations of the California Eocene: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, v. 38, p. 1246.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Waring, C.A., 1917, Stratigraphic and faunal relations of the Martinez to the Chico and Tejon of southern California: Proceedings of the California Academy of Sciences, Series 4, 7, p. 41124.Google Scholar
Warren, G., and Speden, I., 1978, The Piripauan and Haumurian stratotypes (Mata Series, Upper Cretaceous) and correlative sequences in the Haumuri Bluff district, South Marlborough: New Zealand Geological Survey Bulletin, 92, 60 p.Google Scholar
Weaver, C.E., 1905, Contribution to the palaeontology of the Martinez Group: University of California Publications, Bulletin of the Department of Geology, v. 4, p. 101123.Google Scholar
Weaver, C.E., 1916, Tertiary faunal horizons of western Washington: University of Washington Publications in Geology, v. 1, p. 167.Google Scholar
Weaver, C.E., 1942, Paleontology of the marine Tertiary formations of Oregon and Washington: University of Washington Publications in Geology, v. 5, p. 1790.Google Scholar
Weaver, C.E., 1953, Eocene and Paleocene deposits at Martinez, California: University of Washington Publications in Geology, v. 7, p. 1102.Google Scholar
Weaver, C.E., 1944, Correlation of the marine Cenozoic formations of western North America: Bulletin of the Geological Society of America, v. 55, p. 569598.Google Scholar
Wenz, W., 1938-1943, Gastropoda, in Schindewolf, O.H., ed., Handbuch der Palaözoologie, Band 6: Berlin, Borntraeger, 1639 p.Google Scholar
Wilckens, O., 1922, The Upper Cretaceous gastropods of New Zealand: New Zealand Department of Mines, Geological Survey Branch, Palaeontological Bulletin, v. 9, p. 142.Google Scholar
Yokoyama, M., 1911, Some Tertiary fossils from the Miike Coal-field: Journal of the College of Science, Imperial University, Tokyo, v. 28, p. 116.Google Scholar
Zinsmeister, W., 1983, Late Paleocene (“Martinez Provincial Stage”) molluscan fauna from the Simi Hills, Ventura County, California, in Squires, R.L., and Filewicz, M.V., eds., Cenozoic Geology of the Simi Valley Area: Southern California, Pacific Section, SEPM, Fall Field Trip and Guidebook, 35, p. 6170.Google Scholar
Zinsmeister, W.J., and Paredes-Mejia, L.M., 1988, Paleocene biogeography of the west coast of North America: a look at the molluscan fauna from Sepultura Formation, Mesa San Carlos, Baja California Norte, in Filewicz, M.V., and Squires, R.L., eds., Paleogene Stratigraphy: West Coast of North America, Pacific Section, SEPM, West Coast Paleogene Symposium, 58, p. 922.Google Scholar
1
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Northeast Pacific record of the Paleogene genus Pseudoperissolax (Neogastropoda: Muricidae: Muricinae) and its paleobiogeography
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Northeast Pacific record of the Paleogene genus Pseudoperissolax (Neogastropoda: Muricidae: Muricinae) and its paleobiogeography
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Northeast Pacific record of the Paleogene genus Pseudoperissolax (Neogastropoda: Muricidae: Muricinae) and its paleobiogeography
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *