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Mojoceratops perifania, a new chasmosaurine ceratopsid from the late Campanian of Western Canada

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 May 2016

Nicholas R. Longrich*
Affiliation:
Department of Geology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA,

Abstract

A new genus of long-horned chasmosaurine ceratopsid is described from the Dinosaur Park Formation (upper Campanian) of Western Canada. Mojoceratops perifania is represented by a skull and a parietal from the Dinosaur Park Formation of Alberta and an isolated parietal from the Dinosaur Park Formation of Saskatchewan. Several other specimens are provisionally referred to this taxon. While Mojoceratops shares many plesiomorphies with Chasmosaurus, the animal lacks the forward-curving parietal epoccipitals and reduced postorbital horns that diagnose the genus Chasmosaurus, and it differs from all other chasmosaurines in exhibiting a prominent sulcus on the anterior margin of the parietal, swellings on the anterodorsal surface of the parietal rami, and a small accessory process on the first parietal epoccipital. Other unusual features include anteriorly extended parietal fenestrae, a broad, heart-shaped frill, and transverse expansion of the postfrontal fontanelle. The type material of “Eoceratops canadensis” and “Chasmosaurus kaiseni” are nondiagnostic and these names are therefore considered nomina dubia, but their morphology is consistent with Mojoceratops and they probably belong to this genus. The frill of Mojoceratops shows marked variation. Some of this variation probably results from intraspecific variation or ontogenetic changes, but because the Dinosaur Park Formation encompasses more than a million years of time, evolution may explain some of these differences. Phylogenetic analysis shows that Mojoceratops forms a clade with Agujaceratops mariscalensis; Chasmosaurus is the most basal member of Chasmosaurinae.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Paleontological Society

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