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Middle Cambrian arthropods from Utah

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 May 2016

Derek E. G. Briggs
Affiliation:
1Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208109, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8109,
Bruce S. Lieberman
Affiliation:
2Department of Geology, 1475 Jayhawk Boulevard, University of Kansas, 120 Lindley Hall, Lawrence, 66045-7613, ,
Jonathan R. Hendricks
Affiliation:
2Department of Geology, 1475 Jayhawk Boulevard, University of Kansas, 120 Lindley Hall, Lawrence, 66045-7613, ,
Susan L. Halgedahl
Affiliation:
3Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, 135 S. 1460 East, Salt Lake City, 84112, ,
Richard D. Jarrard
Affiliation:
3Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, 135 S. 1460 East, Salt Lake City, 84112, ,

Abstract

The Middle Cambrian Spence Shale Member (Langston Formation) and Wheeler and Marjum Formations of Utah are known to contain a diverse soft-bodied fauna, but important new paleontological material continues to be uncovered from these strata. New specimens of anomalocaridids include the largest and smallest near complete examples yet reported from Utah. New material of stem group arthropods includes two new genera and species of arachnomorphs: Nettapezoura basilika and Dicranocaris guntherorum. Other new arachnomorph material includes a new species of Leanchoilia comparable to L. protogonia Simonetta, 1970; Leanchoilia superlata? Walcott, 1912; Sidneyia Walcott, 1911a; and Mollisonia symmetrica Walcott, 1912. L. protogonia from the Burgess Shale is confirmed as a separate species and is not a composite fossil. The first example of the trilobite Elrathia kingii preserving traces of the appendages is described. In addition, new material of the bivalved arthropods Canadaspis Novozhilov in Orlov, 1960; Branchiocaris Briggs, 1976; Waptia Walcott, 1912; and Isoxys Walcott, 1890 is described.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Paleontological Society 

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