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Ascorbic Acid Levels in Patients Suffering from Psychoses of the Senium

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 February 2018

Donald G. Remp
Affiliation:
From the Department of Neurology and Psychiatry and the Department of Biochemistry, Albany Medical College, Albany, N.Y.
S. R. Rosen
Affiliation:
From the Department of Neurology and Psychiatry and the Department of Biochemistry, Albany Medical College, Albany, N.Y.
John B. Ziegler
Affiliation:
From the Department of Neurology and Psychiatry and the Department of Biochemistry, Albany Medical College, Albany, N.Y.
D. Ewen Cameron
Affiliation:
From the Department of Neurology and Psychiatry and the Department of Biochemistry, Albany Medical College, Albany, N.Y.

Extract

Numerous workers (Plaut, 1935; Altaman, 1937; Monouni, 1937) have reported that the blood and spinal fluid ascorbic acid levels are low in the aged. No adequate explanation of this fact has been given. Wortis (1938) has suggested that, since oral administration increases the ascorbic acid level of the spinal fluid in the aged as in the young, defective absorption probably does not play a significant part. He believes that the lower values in older persons may be due to increased intensity of metabolic processes concerned with the elaboration of ascorbic acid. Friedman, in discussing this contribution, advanced the suggestion that in older persons there may be less need for ascorbic acid because metabolism is slowed.

Type
Part I.—Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1940 

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References

Alexander, L., Pijoan, M., Schube, P. G., and Moore, M. (1938), “Cevitamic Acid Content of Blood Plasma in Alcoholic Psychoses,” Arch. Neurol. and Psychiat., 40, 10751110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Mindelin, R. L., and Butler, A. M. (1938), “Determination of Ascorbic Acid in Plasma, Macromethod and Micromethod,” Journ. Biol. Chem., 122, 673686.Google Scholar
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