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Wind-Structure Interaction by the Numerical Simulation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 May 2011

D. L. Young*
Affiliation:
Department of Civil Engineering & Hydraulic Research Laboratory, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 10617, R.O.C.
J. T. Chang*
Affiliation:
Department of Civil Engineering & Hydraulic Research Laboratory, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 10617, R.O.C.
*
*Professor
**Ph.D. student
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Abstract

A new computational procedure is developed to solve the external field problems of the incompressible viscous flows. The method is able to solve the infinite boundary value problems by extracting the boundary effects coming from the finite computational domain. The present method is based on the projection method of the Navier-Stokes equations. We use three-step explicit finite element method to solve the momentum equation of the flow motion. The external field solver of the boundary element is used to treat the pressure Poisson equation. The arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method is employed to deal with the moving boundary, such as wind-structure interaction problems. For illustration of the present numerical code, a vortex-induced cross-flow oscillations of a circular cylinder mounted on an elastic dashpot-spring system is considered. The phenomena of the beat, lock-in, and resonance are revealed in the Reynolds number range between 100 and 110, which are much narrower than the previous studies.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Society of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, R.O.C. 1999

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References

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