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A One-Continuum Approach for Mutual Interaction of Fluids and Structures

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 May 2015

I. Farahbakhsh
Affiliation:
Department of Ocean Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran
H. Ghassemi*
Affiliation:
Department of Ocean Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran
F. Sabetghadam
Affiliation:
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran
*
*Corresponding author (gasemi@aut.ac.ir)
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Abstract

A new simulation method for solving fluid-structure two-way coupling problems has been developed. All the basic equations are numerically solved on a fixed Cartesian grid using a finite difference scheme. A new definition of velocity-vorticity formulation aids us to introduce an immersed boundary method that does not require a force term to impose the no-slip condition on the solid boundaries. The proposed method is easy to implement and apply for two-way fluid-structure interaction problems. The dynamics of a falling and rising circular cylinder in a quiescent fluid as well as the motion of a circular cylinder in a lid-driven cavity are considered to evaluate the capabilities of the presented method.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Society of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, R.O.C. 2015 

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