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Wide range (20–200 nm) size control of spherical ferrite particles grown on seed crystals in aqueous solution added with sucrose

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Toshiyuki Tanaka
Affiliation:
Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552, Japan; and Tokyo Bio R&D Center, Motortronics Laboratory, Tamagawa Seiki Co., Ltd., Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8510, Japan
Takashi Nakagawa
Affiliation:
Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552, Japan
Adarsh Sandhu
Affiliation:
Quantum Nanoelectronics Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552, Japan; and Integrated Research Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552, Japan
Yutaka Tamaura
Affiliation:
Research Center for Carbon Recycling and Energy, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552, Japan
Hiroshi Handa
Affiliation:
Integrated Research Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552, Japan; and Department of Biological Information, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8501, Japan
Masanori Abe
Affiliation:
Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552, Japan; and Integrated Research Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552, Japan
Corresponding
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Abstract

Spherical particles of ferrite (intermediate between Fe3O4 and γ-Fe2O3) were grown on seed crystals (∼9 nm) via the green rust route in an aqueous solution added with sucrose, which promotes spherical growth. By highly dispersing the seed crystals in an HNO3 solution, we could control the diameter of the particles over a wide range of 20–200 nm (geometric standard deviation: 1.1–1.4) by changing the amount of the seed crystals. At the beginning of the seed growth, clusters of the seed crystals were resolved into smaller clusters, each composed of a few seed crystals.

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Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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References

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Wide range (20–200 nm) size control of spherical ferrite particles grown on seed crystals in aqueous solution added with sucrose
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