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Systematic characterization of 3D-printed PCL/β-TCP scaffolds for biomedical devices and bone tissue engineering: Influence of composition and porosity

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 May 2018

Arnaud Bruyas
Affiliation:
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
Frank Lou
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
Alexander M. Stahl
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
Michael Gardner
Affiliation:
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
William Maloney
Affiliation:
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
Stuart Goodman
Affiliation:
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
Yunzhi Peter Yang
Affiliation:
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bioengineering, Material Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
Corresponding
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Abstract

This work aims at providing guidance through systematic experimental characterization for the design of 3D-printed scaffolds for potential orthopedic applications, focusing on fused deposition modeling with a composite of clinically available polycaprolactone (PCL) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP). First, we studied the effect of the chemical composition (0–60% β-TCP/PCL) on the scaffold’s properties. We showed that surface roughness and contact angle were, respectively, proportional and inversely proportional to the amount of β-TCP and that degradation rate increased with the amount of ceramic. Biologically, the addition of β-TCP enhanced proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of C3H10. Second, we systematically investigated the effect of the composition and the porosity on the 3D-printed scaffold mechanical properties. Both an increasing amount of β-TCP and a decreasing porosity augmented the apparent Young’s modulus of the 3D-printed scaffolds. Third, as a proof of concept, a novel multimaterial biomimetic implant was designed and fabricated for potential disc replacement.

Type
Invited Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2018 

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Footnotes

b)

These authors contributed equally to this work.

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