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Study on the structure of PbS nanoparticles coated with dialkyldithiophosphate

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Shuang Chen
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Lanzhou 730000, People's Republic of China
Weimin Liu
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Lanzhou 730000, People's Republic of China
Laigui Yu
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Lanzhou 730000, People's Republic of China
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Abstract

PbS nanoparticles modified with di-n-hexadecyldithiophosphate (DDP) were prepared by the chemical surface modification method. The structure of the PbS nanoparticles coated with DDP was investigated by means of infrared spectroscopy (ir), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P NMR). The thermal stability of DDP coating on the PbS nanoparticles was compared with that of pyridinium di-n-hexadecyldithiophosphate (PyDDP) using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). It was found that coated PbS nanoparticles had an average diameter of about 5 nm. Surface modification with DDP prevented water adsorption and effectively improved the dispersive capacity and antioxidative stability of PbS nanoparticles. The thermal stability of DDP coating on the surface of nano-PbS particles was higher than that of modifier PyDDP because of the chemical interaction between PyDDP and PbS during the coating process.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1999

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