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Selective streptavidin bioconjugation on silicon and silicon carbide nanowires for biosensor applications

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 August 2012

Elissa H. Williams*
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030; and Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899
John A. Schreifels
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030
Mulpuri V. Rao
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030
Albert V. Davydov*
Affiliation:
Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899
Vladimir P. Oleshko
Affiliation:
Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899
Nancy J. Lin
Affiliation:
Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899
Kristen L. Steffens
Affiliation:
Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899
Sergiy Krylyuk
Affiliation:
Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742; and Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899
Kris A. Bertness
Affiliation:
Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305
Amy K. Manocchi
Affiliation:
Sensors and Electronic Devices Directorate, Army Research Lab, Adelphi, Maryland 20783
Yaroslav Koshka
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, Mississippi 39762
*
a)Address all correspondence to these authors. e-mail: ewilliah@gmu.edu
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Abstract

A functionalization method for the specific and selective immobilization of the streptavidin (SA) protein on semiconductor nanowires (NWs) was developed. Silicon (Si) and silicon carbide (SiC) NWs were functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and subsequently biotinylated for the conjugation of SA. Existence of a thin native oxide shell on both Si and SiC NWs enabled efficient binding of APTES with the successive attachment of biotin and SA as was confirmed with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated nonspecific, electrostatic binding of the SA and the bovine serum albumin (BSA) proteins to APTES-coated NWs. Inhibition of nonspecific BSA binding and enhancement of selective SA binding were achieved on biotinylated NWs. The biofunctionalized NWs have the potential to be used as biosensing platforms for the specific and selective detection of proteins.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2012

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References

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