Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-8hm5d Total loading time: 0.345 Render date: 2022-05-24T09:42:01.107Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

A novel polymer electrolyte based on oligo(ethylene glycol) 600, K2PdCl4, and K3Fe(CN)6

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Vito Di Noto
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Chimica Inorganica, Metallorganica e Analitica dell'Università degli Studi di Padova, Via Loredan 4, I-35131 Padova, Italy
Get access

Abstract

New electrolytic systems were prepared by reacting K3Fe(CN)6 and K2PdCl4 in a mixture of water and poly(ethylene glycol) 600 (PEG). The reaction occurs in two steps: first a gel is formed, which then shrinks, releasing the solvent. The product thus obtained has the consistency of a smooth, solid plastic paste and is very stable. The influence of the reaction mixture on the structure, morphology, and conductivity of the products was investigated carrying out three preparations (I, II, III) at increasing ratio PEG 600/H2O. By FT-IR studies and analytical data it was concluded that these materials are inorganic-organic networks containing CN bridges between Fe and Pd atoms and PEG 600 bridges between Pd atoms. Scanning electron microscopy studies revealed that the morphology of polymers I, II, and III is significantly influenced by the conditions of the synthesis. Conductivity measurements made at different temperatures showed that polymers I, II, and III conduct ionically. The conductivity of polymer I, which was synthesized with the highest water/PEG 600 ratio, is on the order of 1.4 · 10−3 Sycm at 25 °C.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1997

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1.Scrosati, B. and Neat, R. J., in Application of Electroactive Polymers, edited by Scrosati, B. (Chapman and Hall, London, England, 1993), p. 182.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2.Gautier, M., Belanger, A., Kapfer, B., and Vassort, G., in Polymer Electrolyte Reviews-2, edited by MacCallum, J. R. and Vincent, C. A. (Elsevier Applied Science, London, England, 1989), p. 285.Google Scholar
3.Murata, K., Electrochim. Acta 40, 2177 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4.Fauteux, D., Mossucco, A., McLin, M., Van Buren, M., and Shi, J., Electrochim. Acta 40, 2185 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5.Guyomard, D. and Tarascon, J. M., Adv. Mater. 6, 408 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6.Koyamada, T. and Ishihara, H., Electrochim. Acta 40, 2173 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7.Armand, M., Adv. Mater. 2, 278 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8.Vaia, R. A., Vasudevan, S., Krawiec, W., Scaulon, L. G., and Giannelis, E. P., Adv. Mater. 7, 155 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9.Bruce, P. G. and Vincent, C. A., J. Chem. Soc., Faraday Trans. 89, 3187 (1993).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10.Noto, V. Di, Bettinelli, M., Furlani, M., Lavina, S., and Vidali, M., Macromol. Chem. Phys. 197, 375 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11.Pfennig, B. W., Bocarsly, A. B., and Prud'Homme, R. K., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 115, 2661 (1993).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12.Noto, V. Di, Saccon, M., Bresadola, S. and Zannetti, R., Analyst (London) 115, 1041 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13.Basolo, F. and Pearson, R. G., Mechanisms of Inorganic Reactions, 2nd ed. (J. Wiley and Sons, New York, 1967), p. 351.Google Scholar
14.Cotton, F. A. and Wilkinson, G., Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, 5th ed. (J. Wiley and Sons, New York, 1988), p. 919.Google Scholar
15.Rund, J. V., Inorg. Chem. 9, 1211 (1970).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
16.Rund, J. V., Inorg. Chem. 13, 738 (1974).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17.Miyake, A., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 82, 3040 (1960).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
18.Kuroda, Y. and Kubo, M., J. Polym. Sci. 36, 453 (1959).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
19.Machida, K. and Miyazawa, T., Spectrochim. Acta 20, 1865 (1964).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
20.El-Sayed, M. F. A. and Sheline, R. K., J. Inorg. Nucl. Chem. 6, 187 (1958).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
21.Nakamoto, K., Infrared and Raman Spectra of Inorganic and Coordination Compounds, 4th ed. (J. Wiley and Sons, New York, 1986), p. 272.Google Scholar
22.Dows, D. A., Haim, A., and Wilmarth, W. H., J. Inorg. Nucl. Chem. 21, 33 (1961).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
23.Sato, O., Iyoda, T., Fujishima, A., and Hashimoto, K., Science 271, 49 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
24.Vien, D. L., Colthup, N. B., Fateley, W. G., and Grasselli, J. G., The Handbook of Infrared and Raman Characteristic Frequencies of Organic Molecules (Academic Press, Boston, MA, 1991).Google Scholar
25.Matsuura, H. and Miyazawa, T., Bull. Chem. Soc. Jpn. 41, 1798 (1968).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
26.Miyazawa, T., Fukushima, K., and Ideguchi, Y., J. Chem. Phys. 37, 2764 (1962).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
27.Yoshihara, T., Tadokoro, H., and Murahashi, S., J. Chem. Phys. 41, 2902 (1964).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
28.Iwamoto, R., Saito, Y., Ishihara, H., and Tadokoro, H., J. Polym. Sci. A 6, 1509 (1968).Google Scholar
29.Goodfellow, R. J. and Goggin, P. L., J. Chem. Soc. A, 1897 (1967).Google Scholar
30.During, J. R., Layton, R., Sink, D. W., and Mitchell, B. R., Spectrochim. Acta 21, 1367 (1965).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
31.Perry, C. H., Athans, D. P., Young, E. F., During, J. R., and Mitchell, B. R., Spectrochim. Acta 23A, 1137 (1967).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
32.Adams, D. M. and Berg, R. W., Dalton, J. C. S., 440 (1976).Google Scholar
33.Mikami, M., Nakagawa, I., and Shimanouchi, T., Spectrochim. Acta 23A, 1037 (1967).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
34.Jones, L. H., Inorg. Chem. 2, 777 (1963).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
35.Nakagawa, I. and Shimanouchi, T., Spectrochim. Acta 18, 101 (1962).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
36.Griffith, W. P. and Turner, G. T., J. Chem. Soc. A, 858 (1970).Google Scholar
37.Jiang, M., Zhou, X., and Zhao, Z., Ber. Bunsenges, Phys. Chem. 95, 720 (1991).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
38.Pitha, J. and Jones, R. N., Can. J. Chem. 44, 3031 (1966).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
39.Pitha, J. and Jones, R. N., Can. J. Chem. 45, 2347 (1967).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
40.Albinsson, I., Mellander, B-E., and Stevens, J. R., J. Chem. Phys. 96, 681 (1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
41.Ratner, M. A., in Polymer Electrolyte Reviews-1, edited by MacCallum, J. R. and Vincent, C. A. (Elsevier Applied Science, London, England, 1987), p. 173.Google Scholar
42.Gupta, S., Shahi, K., Binesh, N., and Bhat, S. V., Solid State Ionics 67, 97 (1993).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

A novel polymer electrolyte based on oligo(ethylene glycol) 600, K2PdCl4, and K3Fe(CN)6
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

A novel polymer electrolyte based on oligo(ethylene glycol) 600, K2PdCl4, and K3Fe(CN)6
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

A novel polymer electrolyte based on oligo(ethylene glycol) 600, K2PdCl4, and K3Fe(CN)6
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *