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Microstructure of a high strength alumina glass composite

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Helga Hornberger
Affiliation:
University of Birmingham, School of Dentistry, Biomaterials Unit, St. Chad's Queensway, Birmingham B4 6NN, United Kingdom
Peter M. Marquis
Affiliation:
University of Birmingham, School of Dentistry, Biomaterials Unit, St. Chad's Queensway, Birmingham B4 6NN, United Kingdom
Silke Christiansen
Affiliation:
Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Institut für Werkstoffwissenschaften-Mikrocharakterisierung, Cauerstr. 6, 91058 Erlangen, Germany
Horst P. Strunk
Affiliation:
Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Institut für Werkstoffwissenschaften-Mikrocharakterisierung, Cauerstr. 6, 91058 Erlangen, Germany
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Abstract

The morphology and microstructure of an Al2O3 glass composite (trade name In-Ceram, Vita Zahnfabrik) were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The composite was produced by infiltration of a lanthanum-based glass throughout a porous Al2O3 body. This alumina body was formed by three classes of particles differing in size and shape: faceted particles typically ≤4 μm in diameter, platelets of average diameter 8 μm, 1.5 μm thickness, and small spheres 0.4 μm in diameter. The outstanding strength properties of the composite (600 MPa, ball-on-ring test) are a result of the high wetting capability of the glass phase on the Al2O3 surface. In addition, plastic strain relaxation in the faceted particles by dislocation formation compensates partially for residual stresses and impedes crack formation at the glass/Al2O3 interface.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1996

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