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Mechanisms for species-selective oriented crystal growth at organic templates

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Sumit Kewalramani
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208
Kyungil Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208
Guennadi Evmenenko
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208
Paul Zschack
Affiliation:
Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439
Evguenia Karapetrova
Affiliation:
Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439
Jianming Bai
Affiliation:
Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831
Pulak Dutta*
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208
*
a)Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: pdutta@northwestern.edu
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Abstract

Langmuir monolayers floating on supersaturated aqueous subphases can act as templates for the growth of oriented inorganic films—a “bioinspired” nucleation process. We have performed in situ grazing incidence x-ray diffraction studies of the selective nucleation of BaClF and BaF2 under fatty acid monolayers. The arrangement of the fatty acid headgroups, the monolayer charge, and ion-specific effects all play important roles in selecting the inorganic species. When the monolayer is in a neutral state, both BaClF and BaF2 nucleate at the interface and are well aligned, but when the monolayer headgroup is deprotonated, only oriented BaF2 grows at the interface. We also observe an enhanced alignment of BaF2 crystals during growth from highly supersaturated solutions, presumably due to reorganization of preformed crystals at the organic template. These results show that a delicate interplay between multiple factors governs the oriented growth of inorganic films at organic templates.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2007

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References

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