Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-5tm97 Total loading time: 0.162 Render date: 2021-08-03T15:34:21.158Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

The mechanism of combustion synthesis of titanium carbonitride

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 March 2011

M. Eslamloo-Grami
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical, Aeronautical, and Materials Engineering, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616-5294
Z.A. Munir
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical, Aeronautical, and Materials Engineering, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616-5294
Get access

Abstract

Titanium carbonitride, TiC0.5N0.5, is synthesized directly by a self-propagating reaction between titanium and carbon in a nitrogen atmosphere. Complete conversion to the carbonitride phase is achieved with the addition of TiN as diluent and with a nitrogen pressure ≥0.6 MPa. Thermodynamic phase-stability calculations and experimental characterizations of quenched samples support a proposed mechanism in which the formation of the carbonitride is a two-step process. The first step involves the formation of the nonstoichiometric carbide, TiC0.5, and is followed by the formation of the product by the incorporation of nitrogen in the defect-structure carbide to form the carbonitride solid solution.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1994

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1Toth, L. E., Transition Metal Carbides and Nitrides (Academic Press, New York, 1971).Google Scholar
2Pastor, H., Mater. Sci. Eng. A 105/106, 401 (1988).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3Watanabe, T., Doutsu, T., Shoubu, K., and Kai, Y., Mater. Sci. Forum 34–36, 561 (1988).Google Scholar
4Maya, L., in Better Ceramics Through Chemistry II, edited by Brinker, C. J., Clark, D. E., and Ulrich, D. R. (Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 73, Pittsburgh, PA, 1986), p. 401.Google Scholar
5Parkhomenko, V. D., Serdyuk, G. N., and Krasnokutskii, Yu. I., Fiz. Khim. Obrab. Mater. (Russian) 5, 7882 (1986).Google Scholar
6Bolotov, A. V., Musolin, V. N., Kolensnikov, A. V., and Filkov, M. N., Sixth Symposium on Plasma Chemistry 1, 237243 (1983).Google Scholar
7Seyfeth, D. and Mignani, G., Government Report AnnouncementIndex (US) 88 (11), (1988).Google Scholar
8Yoshimura, M., Nishioka, M., and Sōmiya, S., J. Mater. Sci. Lett. 6, 463465 (1987).Google Scholar
9Lyubimov, V. D., Moiseev, G. K., and Timoshchuk, T. A., Neorg.Khim. (Russian) 21 (8), 13211324 (1985).Google Scholar
10Matsumoto, O. and Taki, H., Proc. The Electrochemical Society 88–5, 486493 (1988).Google Scholar
11Yoshimura, H., Jpn. Kokai Tokyo Koho J P 61 17, 471 (1986).Google Scholar
12Zalite, I., Tezisy Dokl.-Konf. Molodykh Nanchn. Rab. Inst. Neorg. Khim., Akad. Nauk Latv. SSSR 5th (Russian), 22–3 (1976).Google Scholar
13Grieveson, P., Proc. The British Ceramic Society 8, 137153 (1967).Google Scholar
14Holt, J. B. and Munir, Z. A., J. Mater. Sci. 21 (1), 251259 (1986).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15Merzhanov, A. G. and Borovinskaya, I. P., Dok. Akad. Nauk SSSR (Chem.) 204, 429432 (1972).Google Scholar
16Kirdyashkin, A. I., Maksinov, Y. M., and Nekrasov, E. A., Combust. Explos. Shock Waves 17, 33 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17Yamada, O., Miyamoto, Y., and Koizumi, M., J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 70 (9), C206C208 (1987).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
18Kharatyan, S. L., Grigor'ev, Y. S., and Merzhanov, A. G., Combust. Explos. Shock Waves 11, 2126 (1975).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
19Munir, Z. A., Deevi, S., and Eslamloo-Grami, M., High Temp.-High Press. 20, 1924 (1988).Google Scholar
20Eslamloo-Grami, M. and Munir, Z. A., J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 73 (5), 12351239 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
21Eslamloo-Grami, M. and Munir, Z. A., J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 73 (8), 22222227 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
22Avakian, A. B., Bagramian, A. R., Borovinskaya, I. P., Grigorian, S. L., and Merzhanov, A. G., in Combustion Process in Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, Chernogolovka, 1975.Google Scholar
23Munir, Z. A., Ceram. Bull. 67, 342 (1988).Google Scholar
24Munir, Z. A. and Anselmi-Tamburini, U., Mater. Sci. Rep. 3, 277365 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
25Yi, H. C. and Moore, J. J., J. Mater. Sci. 25, 1159 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
26Holt, J. B. and Dunmead, S. D., Annu. Rev. Mater. Sci. 21, 305 (1991).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
27Selected Powder Diffraction Data for Metals and Alloys, Data Book First Edition (JCPDS, 1978), Vol. I, pp. 1–26019–515.Google Scholar
28Goldschmidt, H. J., Interstitial Alloys (Plenum Press, New York, 1967), p. 535.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
29The CSIRO Thermochemistry System (Version V.1), CSIRO Institute of Energy and Earth Resources, Division of Mineral Chemistry, Melbourne, Australia, 1990.Google Scholar
30Kubaschewski, O. and Alcock, C. B., Metallurgical Thermochemistry (Pergamon Press, New York, 1979).Google Scholar
31JANAF Thermochemical Tables, National Bureau of Standards, NBS-37, Washington, DC, June 1971.Google Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The mechanism of combustion synthesis of titanium carbonitride
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The mechanism of combustion synthesis of titanium carbonitride
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The mechanism of combustion synthesis of titanium carbonitride
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *