Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-79b67bcb76-f4n6r Total loading time: 0.287 Render date: 2021-05-13T04:27:30.243Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

In vitro bioactivity and antibacterial properties of bismuth oxide modified bioactive glasses

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 December 2017

Sakthi Prasad S
Affiliation:
Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), Campus: CSIR-Central Glass & Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata-700 032, India; and Glass Division, CSIR-Central Glass & Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata-700 032, India
Itishree Ratha
Affiliation:
Bioceramics and Coating Division, CSIR-Central Glass & Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata-700 032, India
Tarun Adarsh
Affiliation:
Ram Lal Anand College, Delhi University, New Delhi-110 021, India
Akrity Anand
Affiliation:
Bioceramics and Coating Division, CSIR-Central Glass & Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata-700 032, India
Prasanta Kumar Sinha
Affiliation:
Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), Campus: CSIR-Central Glass & Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata-700 032, India; and Materials Characterization & Instrumentation Division, CSIR-Central Glass & Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata-700 032, India
Prerna Diwan
Affiliation:
Ram Lal Anand College, Delhi University, New Delhi-110 021, India
Kalyandurg Annapurna
Affiliation:
Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), Campus: CSIR-Central Glass & Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata-700 032, India; and Glass Division, CSIR-Central Glass & Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata-700 032, India
Kaushik Biswas
Affiliation:
Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), Campus: CSIR-Central Glass & Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata-700 032, India; and Glass Division, CSIR-Central Glass & Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata-700 032, India
Corresponding
E-mail address:
Get access

Abstract

Chronic osteomyelitis, a bone infection caused by bacteria, requires extensive parenteral treatments. With an aim to develop bioactive glass with antibacterial properties to resist such infections, bioactive glasses with bismuth oxide as the dopant in various amounts up to 8 wt% were prepared. X-ray diffraction patterns and Fourier-transform infrared spectra of glass samples after immersion in simulated body fluid showed the presence of hydroxyapatite (HAp) and hydroxyl carbonate apatite for all samples except with the one having Bi2O3 substitution of 8 wt%. In vitro cell proliferation by MTT assay studies using a mouse fibroblast cell line (NIH3T3) have also been carried out. Primary antimicrobial activity of the glass particles was analyzed against Escherichia coli (E. coli) using broth microdilution method which exhibited bacteriostatic effects and bactericidal properties in selected samples. The combination of bioactivity, cell proliferation, and antibacterial properties of selected Bismuth-containing bioactive glasses could be exploited in treating bone-related infections.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2017 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

Footnotes

Contributing Editor: Amit Bandyopadhyay

References

Hench, L.L. and Jones, J.R.: Bioactive glasses: Frontiers and challenges. Front. Bioeng. Biotechnol. 3, 1 (2015).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hench, L.L.: The story of Bioglass®. J. Mater. Sci.: Mater. Med. 17, 967 (2006).Google Scholar
Andersson, Ö.H., Liu, G., Karlsson, K.H., Niemi, L., Miettinen, J., and Juhanoja, J.: In vivo behaviour of glasses in the SiO2–Na2O–CaO–P2O5–Al2O3–B2O3 system. J. Mater. Sci.: Mater. Med. 1, 219 (1990).Google Scholar
Brink, M., Turunen, T., Happonen, R-P., and Yli-Urpo, A.: Compositional dependence of bioactivity of glasses in the system Na2O–K2O–MgO–CaO–B2O3–P2O5–SiO2 . J. Biomed. Mater. Res., Part A 37, 114 (1997).3.0.CO;2-G>CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lew, D.P. and Waldvogel, F.A.: Osteomyelitis. Lancet 364, 369 (2004).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sakoulas, G. and Moellering, R.C.: Increasing antibiotic resistance among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains. Clin. Infect. Dis. 46, S360 (2008).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Jia, W-T., Fu, Q., Huang, W-H., Zhang, C-Q., and Rahaman, M.N.: Comparison of borate bioactive glass and calcium sulfate as implants for the local delivery of teicoplanin in the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-induced osteomyelitis in a rabbit model. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 59, 7571 (2015).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Allan, I., Newman, H., and Wilson, M.: Antibacterial activity of particulate Bioglass® against supra-and subgingival bacteria. Biomaterials 22, 1683 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bellantone, M., Williams, H.D., and Hench, L.L.: Broad-spectrum bactericidal activity of Ag2O-doped bioactive glass. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 46, 1940 (2002).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zhu, H., Hu, C., Zhang, F., Feng, X., Li, J., Liu, T., Chen, J., and Zhang, J.: Preparation and antibacterial property of silver-containing mesoporous 58S bioactive glass. Mater. Sci. Eng., C 42, 22 (2014).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ottomeyer, M., Mohammadkah, A., Day, D., and Westenberg, D.: Broad-spectrum antibacterial characteristics of four novel borate-based bioactive glasses. Adv. Microbiol. 6, 776 (2016).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mulligan, A.M., Wilson, M., and Knowles, J.C.: Effect of increasing silver content in phosphate-based glasses on biofilms of Streptococcus sanguis . J. Biomed. Mater. Res., Part A 67, 401 (2003).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Neel, E.A.A., Ahmed, I., Pratten, J., Nazhat, S.N., and Knowles, J.C.: Characterisation of antibacterial copper releasing degradable phosphate glass fibres. Biomaterials 26, 2247 (2005).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mulligan, A.M., Wilson, M., and Knowles, J.C.: The effect of increasing copper content in phosphate-based glasses on biofilms of Streptococcus sanguis . Biomaterials 24, 1797 (2003).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Goh, Y-F., Alshemary, A.Z., Akram, M., Kadir, M.R.A., and Hussain, R.: In vitro characterization of antibacterial bioactive glass containing ceria. Ceram. Int. 40, 729 (2014).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bierer, D.W.: Bismuth subsalicylate: History, chemistry, and safety. Rev. Infect. Dis. 12, S3 (1990).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lambert, J.R. and Midolo, P.: The actions of bismuth in the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection. Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther. 11, 27 (1997).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Parirokh, M. and Torabinejad, M.: Mineral trioxide aggregate: A comprehensive literature review—Part I: Chemical, physical, and antibacterial properties. J. Endod. 36, 16 (2010).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Torabinejad, M. and Parirokh, M.: Mineral trioxide aggregate: A comprehensive literature review—Part II: Leakage and biocompatibility investigations. J. Endod. 36, 190 (2010).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Webster, T.J., Massa-Schlueter, E.A., Smith, J.L., and Slamovich, E.B.: Osteoblast response to hydroxyapatite doped with divalent and trivalent cations. Biomaterials 25, 2111 (2004).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ciobanu, G., Bargan, A.M., and Luca, C.: New bismuth-substituted hydroxyapatite nanoparticles for bone tissue engineering. JOM 67, 2534 (2015).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heid, S., Stoessel, P.R., Tauböck, T.T., Stark, W.J., Zehnder, M., and Mohn, D.: Incorporation of particulate bioactive glasses into a dental root canal sealer. Biomed. Glasses 2, 29 (2016).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mohn, D., Zehnder, M., Imfeld, T., and Stark, W.J.: Radio-opaque nanosized bioactive glass for potential root canal application: Evaluation of radiopacity, bioactivity and alkaline capacity. Int. Endontic. J. 43, 210 (2010).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kokubo, T., Kushitani, H., Sakka, S., Kitsugi, T., and Yamamuro, T.: Solutions able to reproduce in vivo surface-structure changes in bioactive glass-ceramic A–W3 . J. Biomed. Mater. Res. 24, 721 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bernard, S.A., Balla, V.K., Davies, N.M., Bose, S., and Bandyopadhyay, A.: Bone cell–materials interactions and Ni ion release of anodized equiatomic NiTi alloy. Acta Biomater. 7, 1902 (2011).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bodhak, S., Balla, V.K., Bose, S., Bandyopadhyay, A., Kashalikar, U., Jha, S.K., and Sastri, S.: In vitro biological and tribological properties of transparent magnesium aluminate (Spinel) and aluminum oxynitride (ALON®). J. Mater. Sci.: Mater. Med. 22, 1511 (2011).Google Scholar
Andrews, J.M.: Determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations. J. Antimicrob. Chemother. 48, 5 (2001).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ou, X., Xu, S., Warnett, J.M., Holmes, S.M., Zaheer, A., Garforth, A.A., Williams, M.A., Jiao, Y., and Fan, X.: Creating hierarchies promptly: Microwave-accelerated synthesis of ZSM-5 zeolites on macrocellular silicon carbide (SiC) foams. Chem. Eng. J. 312, 1 (2017).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
El Badry, K.M., Moustaffa, F.A., Azooz, M.A., and El Batal, F.H.: Infrared absorption spectroscopy of some bio-glasses before and after immersion in various solutions. Indian J. Pure Appl. Phys. 38, 741 (2000).Google Scholar
Koutsopoulos, S.: Synthesis and characterization of hydroxyapatite crystals: A review study on the analytical methods. J. Biomed. Mater. Res. 62, 600 (2002).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ren, F.Z. and Leng, Y.: Carbonated apatite, type-A or type-B? Key Eng. Mater. 493, 293 (2012).Google Scholar
Ibrahim, D.M., Mostafa, A.A., and Korowash, S.I.: Chemical characterization of some substituted hydroxyapatites. Chem. Cent. J. 5, 74 (2011).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ardelean, I., Cora, S., and Ioncu, V.: Structural investigation of CuO–Bi2O3–B2O3 glasses by FT-IR, Raman and UV-VIS spectroscopies. J. Optoelectron. Adv. Mater. 8, 1843 (2006).Google Scholar
He, F., He, Z., Xie, J., and Li, Y.: IR and Raman spectra properties of Bi2O3–ZnO–B2O3–BaO quaternary glass system. Am. J. Anal. Chem. 5, 1142 (2014).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Massera, J., Fagerlund, S., Hupa, L., and Hupa, M.: Crystallization mechanism of the bioactive glasses, 45S5 and S53P4. J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 95, 607 (2012).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fujikura, K., Karpukhina, N., Kasuga, T., Brauer, D.S., Hill, R.G., and Law, R.V.: Influence of strontium substitution on structure and crystallisation of Bioglass® 45S5. J. Mater. Chem. 22, 7395 (2012).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wang, X., Fagerlund, S., Massera, J., Södergård, B., and Hupa, L.: Do properties of bioactive glasses exhibit mixed alkali behavior? J. Mater. Sci. 52, 8986 (2017).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
da Silva Gasque, K.C., Al-Ahj, L.P., Oliveira, R.C., and Magalhães, A.C.: Cell density and solvent are critical parameters affecting formazan evaluation in MTT assay. Braz. Arch. Biol. Technol. 57, 381 (2014).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kruse, C.R., Singh, M., Targosinski, S., Sinha, I., Sørensen, J.A., Eriksson, E., and Nuutila, K.: The effect of pH on cell viability, cell migration, cell proliferation, wound closure, and wound reepithelialization: In vitro and in vivo study. Wound Repair Regen. 25, 260 (2017).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Galow, A-M., Rebl, A., Koczan, D., Bonk, S.M., Baumann, W., and Gimsa, J.: Increased osteoblast viability at alkaline pH in vitro provides a new perspective on bone regeneration. Biochem. Biophys. Rep. 10, 17 (2017).Google ScholarPubMed
Thomas, F., Bialek, B., and Hensel, R.: Medical use of bismuth: The two sides of the coin. J. Clin. Toxicol. S3, 495 (2011).Google Scholar
Reynolds, P.T., Abalos, K.C., Hopp, J., and Williams, M.E.: Bismuth toxicity: A rare cause of neurologic dysfunction. Int. J. Clin. Med. 3, 46 (2012).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Feng, Q.L., Wu, J., Chen, G.Q., Cui, F.Z., Kim, T.N., Kim, J.O., Kim, T.N., and Kim, J.O.: A mechanistic study of the antibacterial effect of silver ions on Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus . J. Biomed. Mater. Res. 52, 662 (2000).3.0.CO;2-3>CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

In vitro bioactivity and antibacterial properties of bismuth oxide modified bioactive glasses
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

In vitro bioactivity and antibacterial properties of bismuth oxide modified bioactive glasses
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

In vitro bioactivity and antibacterial properties of bismuth oxide modified bioactive glasses
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *