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In situ transformation behavior of icosahedral and decagonal quasicrystalline phases

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

C. Suryanarayana
Affiliation:
Center of Advanced Study in Metallurgy, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221005, India
Subash Chandra
Affiliation:
Center of Advanced Study in Metallurgy, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221005, India
Jyothi Menon
Affiliation:
Center of Advanced Study in Metallurgy, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221005, India
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Abstract

Results of in situ hot-stage electron microscopic investigations on the transformation behavior of icosahedral Mg32 (Al,Zn)49 and decagonal Al–Co quasicrystalline phases are presented. It is shown that in both the cases the transformation begins with the formation of fine holes. This has been interpreted on the basis of the lower density of the quasicrystalline phase. Differences in the transformation behavior between the icosahedral and decagonal phases are highlighted.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1988

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In situ transformation behavior of icosahedral and decagonal quasicrystalline phases
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