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Grain-refinement mechanisms in titanium alloys

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

M.J. Bermingham
Affiliation:
CAST Cooperative Research Centre, School of Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4067, Australia
S.D. McDonald
Affiliation:
CAST Cooperative Research Centre, School of Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4067, Australia
M.S. Dargusch
Affiliation:
CAST Cooperative Research Centre, School of Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4067, Australia
D.H. StJohn
Affiliation:
CAST Cooperative Research Centre, School of Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4067, Australia
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Abstract

Despite the importance of the prior-β grain structure in determining the properties of titanium-based alloys, there are few published studies on methods of controlling the size of these grains in commercial alloys. The existing research raises questions about the relative importance of solute elements in grain-refining mechanisms, particularly the common alloying elements of aluminum and vanadium. The effect of these elements was investigated by producing a series of castings in a nonconsumable arc-melting furnace, and the results were interpreted with the aid of available phase-diagram information and solute-based models of grain refinement. A small reduction in grain size was obtained with increasing solute additions; however, this was not expected from the theoretical analysis. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed.

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Copyright © Materials Research Society 2008

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