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A finite difference model for the combustion of zirconium in oxygen

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

K. H. Ewald
Affiliation:
Facility for Advanced Combustion Synthesis (FACS), Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, California 95616
U. Anselmi-Tamburini
Affiliation:
Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy
Z. A. Munir
Affiliation:
Facility for Advanced Combustion Synthesis (FACS), Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, California 95616
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Abstract

The combustion of zirconium in oxygen was simulated using a two-dimensional finite difference model. The model accounts for heat generation by the oxidation reaction and heat loss due to convective and radiative processes. Using geometric considerations along with the heat transfer conditions, the model was utilized to determine the effect of dilution and particle size on the combustion process. Dilution was examined in regular and random geometries and the results showed a marked influence on the nonlinearity of the wave. The effect of particle size was also examined as a function of the geometry of diluent dispersion.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2000

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A finite difference model for the combustion of zirconium in oxygen
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