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Effect of precipitates on grain growth in non-oriented silicon steel

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 April 2017

Fangjie Li
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Advanced Special Steel & Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced Ferrometallurgy & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072, China
Huigai Li*
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Advanced Special Steel & Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced Ferrometallurgy & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072, China
Yuan Wu
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Advanced Special Steel & Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced Ferrometallurgy & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072, China
Dan Zhao
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Advanced Special Steel & Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced Ferrometallurgy & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072, China
Bowen Peng
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Advanced Special Steel & Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced Ferrometallurgy & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072, China
Hefei Huang
Affiliation:
Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Shanghai 201800, China
Shaobo Zheng
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Advanced Special Steel & Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced Ferrometallurgy & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072, China
Jinglin You
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Advanced Special Steel & Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced Ferrometallurgy & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072, China
*
a) Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: lihuigai@shu.edu.cn
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Abstract

Precipitates and grain sizes in non-oriented silicon steel samples, which were hot-rolled (HR), continuously annealed (CA), and stress-relief-annealed (SA), were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with electron back-scattered diffraction. The average grain sizes of the HR, CA, and SA samples were 28, 46, and 46 μm, respectively. SEM observations revealed that the precipitates were mainly dispersed inside grains in the HR and the CA samples, but mainly at grain boundaries in the SA sample. The density of precipitates was highest in the SA sample and lowest in the HR sample. Precipitates at the grain boundaries, which were identified as manganese sulfides, were nearly spherical, their diameter ranging from 0.3 to 0.7 μm. We calculated the pining force exerted by grain-boundary precipitates and found that it outweighed the driving force of the grain growth that was controlled by boundary curvature.

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Copyright © Materials Research Society 2017 

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Footnotes

Contributing Editor: Jürgen Eckert

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