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Effect of nitrogen in the reaction atmosphere on the microstructure of carbon nanofibers grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Shinn-Shyong Tzeng
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Engineering, Tatung University, Taipei 104, Taiwan
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Abstract

Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with different microstructures were synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition using different growth temperatures and methane/nitrogen gas mixtures. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images revealed that bamboolike structure could be formed both by increasing the growth temperature and by increasing the nitrogen content in the reaction atmosphere at a lower growth temperature. Elemental analysis results indicated that no significant change in the nitrogen concentration was found regardless of the increase of nitrogen flow in the feed gas. The formation of bamboolike structure of CNFs and the effect of nitrogen gas on the microstructure change of CNFs were discussed.

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Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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Effect of nitrogen in the reaction atmosphere on the microstructure of carbon nanofibers grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition
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