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Effect of material properties on integration damage in organosilicate glass films

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

E. Todd Ryan*
Affiliation:
Advanced Micro Devices, AMD/Motorola Alliance, 3501 Ed Bluestein Boulevard, Austin, Texas 78721
Jeremy Martin
Affiliation:
Advanced Micro Devices, AMD/Motorola Alliance, 3501 Ed Bluestein Boulevard, Austin, Texas 78721
Kurt Junker
Affiliation:
Motorola, APRDL, 3501 Ed Bluestein Boulevard, Austin, Texas 78721
Jeff Wetzel
Affiliation:
International SEMATECH, 2706 Montopolis Drive, Austin, Texas 78757
David W. Gidley
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
Jianing Sun
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
*
a)Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: r6758c@email.sps.mot.com
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Extract

Most organosilicate glass (OSG), low dielectric constant (low-κ) films contain Si–R groups, where R is an organic moiety such as −CH3. The organic component is susceptible to the chemically reactive plasmas used to deposit cap layers, etch patterns, and ash photoresist. This study compares a spin-on, mesoporous OSG film with a completely connected pore structure to both its nonmesoporous counterpart and to another low-density OSG film deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The results show that the film with connected pores was much more susceptible to integration damage than were the nonmesoporous OSG films.

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Rapid Communications
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2001

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References

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