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Deformation-induced microstructural changes in Fe40Ni40P14B6 metallic glass

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

G.J. Fan
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory for RSA, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Science, Shenyang 110015, China, and IFW Dresden, Institute of Metallic Materials, 01171 Dresden, Germany
M. X. Quan
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory for RSA, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Science, Shenyang 110015, China
Z. Q. Hu
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory for RSA, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Science, Shenyang 110015, China
W. Löser
Affiliation:
IFW Dresden, Institute of Metallic Materials, 01171 Dresden, Germany
J. Eckert
Affiliation:
IFW Dresden, Institute of Metallic Materials, 01171 Dresden, Germany
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Abstract

The effect of mechanical deformation via high-energy ball milling on the structure of the Fe40Ni40P14B6 metallic glass was studied by means of x-ray diffactometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). After 5 h of milling, TEM observations indicated that some nanocrystallites with a diameter of about 6 nm precipitated from surface layers of the amorphous ribbons, whereas the bulk remained amorphous. When milling time was increased to 11 h, bulk crystallization occurred. The amorphous Fe40Ni40P14B6 alloy crystallized into a mixture of γ–(Fe, Ni) and (Fe, Ni)3(P, B). To understand the microstructural changes occurring in the amorphous ribbons before the onset of bulk crystallization, the isothermal crystallization behavior of as-deformed amorphous ribbons was studied. Compared with as-quenched amorphous ribbons, the local value of the Avrami exponent, derived from isothermal DSC data, increased from 3.5 to 4.1 for bulk crystallization. The thermal crystallization mechanism of deformed amorphous Fe40Ni40P14B6 ribbons changed from an eutectic-type reaction with simultaneous precipitation of γ–(Fe, Ni) and (Fe, Ni)3(P,B) from the amorphous matrix to a primary-type reaction with precipitation of α–Fe(P,B) preceding the formation of γ–(Fe,Ni) and (Fe,Ni)3(P,B). Our results suggest that several hours of mechanical milling cause surface crystallization and some atomic rearrangements in the amorphous alloy. The latter effect may be responsible for the observed primary-type reaction for crystallization of the deformed amorphous alloy

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1999

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