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Compressive strength of hollow microlattices: Experimental characterization, modeling, and optimal design

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 June 2013

Lorenzo Valdevit*
Affiliation:
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, California 92697
Scott W. Godfrey
Affiliation:
Computer Science Department, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, California 92697
Tobias A. Schaedler
Affiliation:
Sensors and Materials Lab, HRL Laboratories, LLC, Malibu, California 90265
Alan J. Jacobsen
Affiliation:
Sensors and Materials Lab, HRL Laboratories, LLC, Malibu, California 90265
William B. Carter
Affiliation:
Sensors and Materials Lab, HRL Laboratories, LLC, Malibu, California 90265
*Corresponding
a)Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: Valdevit@uci.edu
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Abstract

Recent advances in multiscale manufacturing enable fabrication of hollow-truss based lattices with dimensional control spanning seven orders of magnitude in length scale (from ∼50 nm to ∼10 cm), thus enabling the exploitation of nano-scale strengthening mechanisms in a macroscale cellular material. This article develops mechanical models for the compressive strength of hollow microlattices and validates them with a selection of experimental measurements on nickel microlattices over a wide relative density range (0.01–10%). The limitations of beam-theory-based analytical approaches for ultralight designs are emphasized, and suitable numerical (finite elements) models are presented. Subsequently, a novel computational platform is utilized to efficiently scan the entire design space and produce maps for optimally strong designs. The results indicate that a strong compressive response can be obtained by stubby lattice designs at relatively high densities (∼10%) or by selectively thickening the nodes at ultra-low densities.

Type
Invited Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2013 

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