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C24Cs samples containing oriented N2 molecules

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Y. Finkelstein
Affiliation:
Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva 84105, Israel
R. Moreh
Affiliation:
Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva 84105, Israel
D. Nemirovsky
Affiliation:
Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva 84105, Israel
O. Shahal
Affiliation:
Physics Department, Nuclear Research Center-Negev, Beer-Sheva 84190 Israel
F. Beguin
Affiliation:
Centre de Recherche sur la Matiere Divisee, CNRS-Université, 1B, F-45071 Orléans Cedex 02, France
L. Duclaux
Affiliation:
Centre de Recherche sur la Matiere Divisee, CNRS-Université, 1B, F-45071 Orléans Cedex 02, France
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Abstract

The adsorption of N2 molecules inside C24Cs has been studied in detail as a function of temperature and pressure using n-diffraction and nuclear resonance photon scattering (NRPS). Large differences were observed between samples derived from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and those prepared from graphite powder. The tilt angle of the N2 molecular axis was determined by using NRPS and found to lay nearly parallel to the graphite planes. The amount of adsorbed N2 increased with decreasing temperatures, reaching saturation composition C24Cs(N2)1.5 at approximately 100 K with an initial N2 pressure of 2 bar. At higher pressure, 9 bar, two new phases were formed: a second stage C32Cs(N2)2.1 and a first stage C16Cs(N2)1.8 at T < 170 K and are discussed in detail.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1999

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