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Legal and Policy Responses to Vaccine-Preventable Disease Outbreaks

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2021

Abstract

Laws and policies are vital tools in preventing outbreaks and limiting the further spread of disease, but they can vary in content and implementation. This manuscript provides insight into challenges in responding to recent vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks by examining legislative changes in California, policy changes on certain university campuses, and the laws implicated in a measles outbreak in Minnesota.

Type
Symposium Articles
Copyright
Copyright © American Society of Law, Medicine and Ethics 2019

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