Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-66d7dfc8f5-tkm4r Total loading time: 0.462 Render date: 2023-02-08T09:45:41.284Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Physiological changes in the size of the septal swell body correlate with changes in inferior turbinate size

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 April 2020

E H Wong*
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, Australia Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
M Noussair
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, St George Hospital, Sydney, Australia
Z Hasan
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, Australia
M Duvnjak
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, Australia
N Singh
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, Australia Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
*
Author for correspondence: Dr Eugene H Wong, Department of Otolaryngology, Westmead Hospital, University of Sydney, Hawkesbury Rd, SydneyNSW2145, Australia E-mail: eugene.hl.wong@gmail.com

Abstract

Objective

The nasal septal swell body is a normal anatomical structure located in the superior nasal septum anterior to the middle turbinate. However, the impact of the septal swell body in nasal breathing during normal function and disease remains unclear. This study aimed to establish that the septal swell body varies in size over time and correlates this with the natural variation of the inferior turbinates.

Method

Consecutive patients who underwent at least two computed tomography scans were identified. The width and height of the septal swell body and the inferior turbinates was recorded. A correlation between the difference in septal swell body and turbinates between the two scans was performed using a Pearson's coefficient.

Results

A total of 34 patients (53 per cent female with a mean age of 58.3 ± 20.2 years) were included. The mean and mean difference in septal swell body width between scans for the same patient was 1.57 ± 1.00 mm. The mean difference in turbinate width between scans was 2.23 ± 2.52 mm. A statistically significant correlation was identified between the difference in septal swell body and total turbinate width (r = 0.35, p = 0.04).

Conclusion

The septal swell body is a dynamic structure that varies in width over time in close correlation to the inferior turbinates. Further research is required to quantify its relevance as a surgical area of interest.

Type
Main Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Footnotes

Dr E H Wong takes responsibility for the integrity of the content of the paper

References

Stewart, M, Ferguson, BJ, Fromer, L. Epidemiology and burden of nasal congestion. Int J Gen Med 2010;3:3745CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Corey, JP, Houser, SM, Ng, BA. Nasal congestion: a review of its etiology, evaluation and treatment. Ear Nose Throat J 2000;79:690–3CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Joniau, S, Wong, I, Rajapaksa, S, Carney, SA, Wormald, PJ. Long-term comparison between submucosal cauterization and powered reduction of the inferior turbinates. Laryngoscope 2006;116:1612–16CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Siegel, NS, Gliklich, RE, Taghizadeh, F, Chang, Y. Outcomes of septoplasty. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2000;122:228–32CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ciolek, PJ, Xu, A, Anne, S, Geelan-Hansen, K. Role of adenoidectomy in chronic nasal obstruction after nasal steroid therapy failure. Am J Otolaryngol 2017;38:305–8CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Costa, DJ, Sanford, T, Janney, C, Cooper, M, Sindwani, R. Radiographic and anatomic characterization of the nasal septal swell body. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2010;136:1107–10CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Negus, V. The comparative anatomy and physiology of the nose and paranasal sinuses. Edinburgh: E&S Livingstone, 1958Google Scholar
Wexler, D, Bravermann, I, Amar, M. Histology of the nasal septal swell body (septal turbinate) Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2006;134:596600CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Martinez, SA, Nissen, AJ, Stock, CR, Tesmer, T. Nasal turbinate resection for relief of nasal obstruction. Laryngoscope 1983;93:871–5CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Smith, DH, Brook, CD, Virani, S, Platt, MP. The inferior turbinate: an autonomic organ. Am J Otolaryngol 2018;39:771–5CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Berger, G, Gass, S, Ophir, D. The histopathology of the hypertrophic inferior turbinate. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2006;132:588–94CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gelera, JE, Ojar, D, Lim, JH, Wee, JH, Kim, JW, Rhee, CS. Radiographic changes of the nasal septal body among patients with sinonasal diseases. Clin Exp Otorhinolaryngol 2017;10:338–43CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yu, MS, Kim, JY, Kim, BH, Kang, SH, Lim, DJ. Feasibility of septal body volume reduction for patients with nasal obstruction. Laryngoscope 2015;125:1523–8CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Catalano, P, Ashmead, MG, Carlson, D. RadioFrequency ablation of septal swell body. Ann Otolaryngol Rhino 2015;2:1069Google Scholar
2
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Physiological changes in the size of the septal swell body correlate with changes in inferior turbinate size
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Physiological changes in the size of the septal swell body correlate with changes in inferior turbinate size
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Physiological changes in the size of the septal swell body correlate with changes in inferior turbinate size
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *