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Impact of pre-operative body mass index in head and neck cancer patients undergoing microvascular reconstruction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 October 2017

D-J Hyun
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, GNG Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Y-H Joo
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea
M-S Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Corresponding
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Abstract

Objectives:

To analyse the relationship of pre-operative body mass index with surgical complications and oncological outcomes in patients undergoing microvascular reconstruction for head and neck squamous cell cancer.

Method:

A retrospective review was conducted of 259 patients who underwent microvascular free flap reconstruction after head and neck ablative surgery.

Results:

Mean body mass index was 22.48 kg/m2. There were no correlations between body mass index and: flap failure (p = 0.739), flap ischaemia (p = 0.644), pharyngocutaneous fistula (p = 0.141) or wound infection (p = 0.224). The five-year disease-specific survival rate was 63 per cent. On univariate analysis, the five-year disease-specific survival rate was significantly correlated with pre-operative body mass index, based on Kaplan–Meier survival curves (p = 0.028). The five-year disease-specific survival rates in underweight, normal weight, overweight and obese groups were 47 per cent, 55 per cent, 65 per cent and 80 per cent, respectively.

Conclusion:

Pre-operative body mass index was a useful predictor for recurrence and survival in patients who underwent microvascular reconstruction for head and neck squamous cell cancer.

Type
Main Articles
Copyright
Copyright © JLO (1984) Limited 2017 

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References

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