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Facial reanimation with end-to-end hypoglossofacial anastomosis: 20 years’ experience

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 September 2009

T Catli*
Affiliation:
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Gazi University, Ankara, Turkey
Y A Bayazit
Affiliation:
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Gazi University, Ankara, Turkey
O Gokdogan
Affiliation:
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Gazi University, Ankara, Turkey
N Goksu
Affiliation:
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Gazi University, Ankara, Turkey
*
Address for correspondence: Dr Tolgahan Catli, Gazi Universitesi Tıp Fakültesi, Kulak Burun Boğaz AD, Besevler, Ankara, Turkey. E-mail: tcatli80@hotmail.com

Abstract

Objective:

This study aimed to evaluate retrospectively the results of experience with end-to-end anastomosis of cranial nerves VII and XII, performed due to transection of the facial nerve during acoustic neuroma removal.

Methods:

We assessed the facial reanimation results of 33 patients whose facial nerves had been transected during acoustic neuroma excision via a retrosigmoid approach, between 1985 and 2006, and who underwent end-to-end hypoglossofacial anastomosis. We compared the facial nerve functions of patients receiving short term (two to three years) and long term (more than three years) follow up, and we assessed any complications of the anastomosis.

Results:

A House–Brackmann grade III facial function was achieved in 46.2 and 86.4 per cent of the patients in the short and long term, respectively. House–Brackmann grade IV facial function was achieved in 53.8 and 13.6 per cent of the patients in the short and long term, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between the facial recovery results, comparing the short and long term follow-up periods (p = 0.03). Disarticulation was the most common complication, seen in 19 (57.6 per cent) patients; numbness of the tongue was the next commonest (10 (30.3 per cent) patients). None of the patients developed dysphagia.

Conclusion:

Despite such morbidities as disarticulation and tongue numbness, end-to-end hypoglossofacial anastomosis is still an effective procedure for the surgical rehabilitation of static and dynamic facial nerve functions. Significant improvement in facial nerve function can occur more than three years post-operatively.

Type
Main Articles
Copyright
Copyright © JLO (1984) Limited 2009

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References

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