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Predation of the fungus Duddingtonia flagrans on infective larvae of gastrointestinal nematodes from heifers in a silvopastoral system under shaded and sunny conditions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 March 2022

Barbara Haline Buss Baiak*
Affiliation:
Programa de Pós-graduação em Zootecnia, Departamento de Zootecnia, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba80035-050, Paraná, Brazil
Karolini Tenffen de Sousa
Affiliation:
Programa de Pós-graduação em Zootecnia, Departamento de Zootecnia, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba80035-050, Paraná, Brazil
Matheus Deniz
Affiliation:
Programa de Pós-graduação em Zootecnia, Departamento de Zootecnia, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba80035-050, Paraná, Brazil
Jennifer Mayara Gasparina
Affiliation:
Programa de Pós-graduação em Zootecnia, Departamento de Zootecnia, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, Ponta Grossa84030-900, Paraná, Brazil
Letícia Ianke
Affiliation:
Programa de Pós-graduação em Zootecnia, Departamento de Zootecnia, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, Ponta Grossa84030-900, Paraná, Brazil
Leticia Macedo Pereira
Affiliation:
Programa de Pós-graduação em Zootecnia, Departamento de Zootecnia, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba80035-050, Paraná, Brazil
Jackson Victor Araújo
Affiliation:
Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil
Raquel Abdallah Rocha
Affiliation:
Programa de Pós-graduação em Zootecnia, Departamento de Zootecnia, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, Ponta Grossa84030-900, Paraná, Brazil
João Ricardo Dittrich
Affiliation:
Programa de Pós-graduação em Zootecnia, Departamento de Zootecnia, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba80035-050, Paraná, Brazil
*
Author for correspondence: B.H. Buss Baiak, E-mail: barbara_baiak@hotmail.com

Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate the predatory activity of the nematophagous fungus Duddingtonia flagrans on infective larvae of gastrointestinal nematodes from dairy heifers in different conditions (shaded and sunny) of a silvopastoral system (SPS) on an agroecological farm. Ten Jersey heifers were divided into two groups: treated (received pellets containing fungus); and control (received pellets without fungus). Twelve hours after fungus administration, faeces samples were collected for in vitro efficacy tests. The animals then remained for 8 h in the experimental pasture area. At the end of this period, 20 faecal pads (10 treated and 10 control) were selected. Pasture, faecal pad and soil collections occurred at intervals of seven days (d), totalling four assessments over 28 d. To evaluate the influence of the conditions shaded and sunny, we registered the condition of the location of each faecal pad per hour. After 12 h of gastrointestinal transit in dairy heifers, a reduction of 65% was obtained through the in vitro test. The treated group presented a lower number of infective larvae (L3) in the faecal pad and upper pasture. Differences in numbers of L3 were observed between the conditions (sunny and shaded) in the faecal pad of the control group; while in the treated group there were no differences between the conditions. The predatory activity of the fungus was efficient over time in the shaded and sunny conditions of an SPS, decreasing the parasite contamination during the pasture recovery time in a subtropical climate.

Type
Research Paper
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press

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