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Phenotypes of intermediate forms of Fasciola hepatica and F. gigantica in buffaloes from Central Punjab, Pakistan

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 June 2013

K. Afshan
Affiliation:
Departamento de Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Valencia, Av. Vicent Andrés Estellés s/n, 46100Burjassot, Valencia, Spain Department of Zoology, Pir Mehr Ali Shah-Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi46300, Pakistan
M.A. Valero
Affiliation:
Departamento de Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Valencia, Av. Vicent Andrés Estellés s/n, 46100Burjassot, Valencia, Spain
M. Qayyum
Affiliation:
Department of Zoology, Pir Mehr Ali Shah-Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi46300, Pakistan
R.V. Peixoto
Affiliation:
Departamento de Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Valencia, Av. Vicent Andrés Estellés s/n, 46100Burjassot, Valencia, Spain
A. Magraner
Affiliation:
Departamento de Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Valencia, Av. Vicent Andrés Estellés s/n, 46100Burjassot, Valencia, Spain
S. Mas-Coma
Affiliation:
Departamento de Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Valencia, Av. Vicent Andrés Estellés s/n, 46100Burjassot, Valencia, Spain
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Fascioliasis is an important food-borne parasitic disease caused by the two trematode species, Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica. The phenotypic features of fasciolid adults and eggs infecting buffaloes inhabiting the Central Punjab area, Pakistan, have been studied to characterize fasciolid populations involved. Morphometric analyses were made with a computer image analysis system (CIAS) applied on the basis of standardized measurements. Since it is the first study of this kind undertaken in Pakistan, the results are compared to pure fasciolid populations: (a) F. hepatica from the European Mediterranean area; and (b) F. gigantica from Burkina Faso; i.e. geographical areas where both species do not co-exist. Only parasites obtained from bovines were used. The multivariate analysis showed that the characteristics, including egg morphometrics, of fasciolids from Central Punjab, Pakistan, are between F. hepatica and F. gigantica standard populations. Similarly, the morphometric measurements of fasciolid eggs from Central Punjab are also between F. hepatica and F. gigantica standard populations. These results demonstrate the existence of fasciolid intermediate forms in endemic areas in Pakistan.

Type
Research Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013 

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