Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-5rlvm Total loading time: 0.201 Render date: 2021-10-22T00:39:39.900Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Lymnaea glabra: progressive increase in susceptibility to Fasciola hepatica through successive generations of experimentally infected snails

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 April 2014

D. Rondelaud
Affiliation:
INSERM 1094, Faculties of Medicine and Pharmacy, 87025Limoges, France
F.F. Djuikwo Teukeng
Affiliation:
INSERM 1094, Faculties of Medicine and Pharmacy, 87025Limoges, France Faculty of Health Sciences, Université des Montagnes, B.P. 208, Banganté, Cameroon
P. Vignoles
Affiliation:
INSERM 1094, Faculties of Medicine and Pharmacy, 87025Limoges, France
G. Dreyfuss*
Affiliation:
INSERM 1094, Faculties of Medicine and Pharmacy, 87025Limoges, France
*
*Fax: +33.5.55.43.58.63 E-mail: gilles.dreyfuss@unilim.fr

Abstract

Experimental infections of Lymnaea glabra (two populations) with Fasciola hepatica were carried out during seven successive snail generations, to determine if prevalence and intensity of snail infection increased over time through descendants of snails already infected with F. hepatica. Controls were descendants coming from uninfected parents and infected according to the same protocol. No larval forms were found in the bodies of control snails coming from uninfected parents. In contrast, prevalence and intensity of F. hepatica infection in snails originating from infected parents progressively increased from the F2 or F3 to the F6 generation of L. glabra. In another experiment carried out with the F7 generations of L. glabra and a single generation of Galba truncatula (as controls), the prevalence of F. hepatica infection and the total number of cercariae were lower in L. glabra (without significant differences between both populations). If the number of cercariae shed by infected snails was compared to overall cercarial production noted in snails containing cercariae but dying without emission, the percentage was greater in G. truncatula (69% instead of 52–54% in L. glabra). Even if most characteristics of F. hepatica infection were lower in L. glabra, prevalence and intensity of parasite infection increased with snail generation when tested snails came from infected parents. This mode of snail infection with F. hepatica suggests an explanation for cases of fasciolosis occurring in cattle-breeding farms where paramphistomosis is lacking and G. truncatula is absent.

Type
Research Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Abrous, M., Rondelaud, D. & Dreyfuss, G. (1996) Paramphistomum daubneyi and Fasciola hepatica: the effect of dual infection on prevalence and cercarial shedding in preadult Lymnaea glabra. Journal of Parasitology 82, 10261029.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Abrous, M., Rondelaud, D., Dreyfuss, G. & Cabaret, J. (1998) Unusual transmission of the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, by Lymnaea glabra or Planorbis leucostoma in France. Journal of Parasitology 84, 12571259.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Abrous, M., Rondelaud, D., Dreyfuss, G. & Cabaret, J. (1999) Infection of Lymnaea truncatula and Lymnaea glabra by Fasciola hepatica and Paramphistomum daubneyi in farms of central France. Veterinary Research 30, 113118.Google ScholarPubMed
Abrous, M., Rondelaud, D. & Dreyfuss, G. (2000) A field study of natural infections in three freshwater snails with Fasciola hepatica and/or Paramphistomum daubneyi in central France. Journal of Helminthology 74, 189194.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Andrews, S.J. (1999) The life cycle of Fasciola hepatica. pp. 129in Dalton, J.P. (Ed.) Fasciolosis. Wallingford, Oxon, CABI Publishing.Google Scholar
Boray, J.C. (1969) Experimental fascioliasis in Australia. Advances in Parasitology 7, 95210.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Boray, J.C. (1978) The potential impact of exotic Lymnaea spp. on fascioliasis in Australasia. Veterinary Parasitology 4, 127141.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bouix-Busson, D. & Rondelaud, D. (1986) L'infestation de Lymnaea glabra Müller par Fasciola hepatica L. Etude expérimentale sur le terrain. Annales de Parasitologie Humaine et Comparée 61, 215225.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bouix-Busson, D., Rondelaud, D. & Barthe, D. (1984) Experimental infection of Lymnaea glabra and L. truncatula by Fasciola hepatica. Journal of Parasitology 70, 10021003.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bouix-Busson, D., Rondelaud, D. & Combes, C. (1985) L'infestation de Lymnaea glabra Müller par Fasciola hepatica L. Les caractéristiques des émissions cercariennes. Annales de Parasitologie Humaine et Comparée 60, 1121.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Busson, P., Busson, D., Rondelaud, D. & Pestre-Alexandre, M. (1982) Données expérimentales sur l'infestation des jeunes de cinq espèces de limnées par Fasciola hepatica L. Annales de Parasitologie Humaine et Comparée 57, 555563.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dreyfuss, G., Vignoles, P. & Rondelaud, D. (2003) Natural infections of Omphiscola glabra with Fasciola hepatica in central France. Parasitology Research 91, 458461.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dreyfuss, G., Vignoles, P. & Rondelaud, D. (2005) Fasciola hepatica: epidemiological surveillance of natural watercress beds in central France. Parasitology Research 95, 278282.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dreyfuss, G., Vignoles, P. & Rondelaud, D. (2007a) Fasciola hepatica: the infectivity of cattle-origin miracidia had increased over the past years in central France. Parasitology Research 101, 11571160.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dreyfuss, G., Novobilský, A., Vignoles, P., Bellet, V., Koudela, B. & Rondelaud, D. (2007b) Prevalence and intensity of infections in the lymnaeid snail Omphiscola glabra experimentally infected with Fasciola hepatica, Fascioloides magna and Paramphistomum daubneyi. Journal of Helminthology 81, 712.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Germain, L. (1930/1931) Mollusques terrestres et fluviatiles. 893 pp. Faune de France, nos. 21 and 22. Paris, Librairie de la Faculté des Sciences.Google Scholar
Gold, D. (1980) Growth and survival of the snail Lymnaea truncatula: effects of soil type, culture medium and Fasciola hepatica infection. Israel Journal of Zoology 29, 163170.Google Scholar
Hubendick, B. (1951) Recent Lymnaeidae. Their variation, morphology, taxonomy, nomenclature, and distribution. Küngliga Svenska Vetenskapsakademiens Handlingar 3, 1223.Google Scholar
Ollerenshaw, C.B. (1971) Some observations on the epidemiology of fascioliasis in relation to the timing of molluscicide applications in the control of the disease. The Veterinary Record 88, 152164.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pointier, J.P., Coustau, C., Rondelaud, D. & Théron, A. (2007) Pseudosuccinea columella (Say 1817) (Gastropoda, Lymnaeidae), snail vector of Fasciola hepatica: first record for France in the wild. Parasitology Research 101, 13891392.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Préveraud-Sindou, M. & Rondelaud, D. (1995) Localization and outcome of Fasciola hepatica sporocysts in Lymnaea truncatula subjected to mono- or pluri- miracidial exposures. Parasitology Research 81, 265267.Google ScholarPubMed
Préveraud-Sindou, M., Dreyfuss, G. & Rondelaud, D. (1994) Comparison of the migrations of Fasciola hepatica sporocysts in Lymnaea truncatula and other related snail families. Parasitology Research 80, 342346.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rondelaud, D. (2004) Cressonnières naturelles du Limousin et risques de distomatose humaine à Fasciola hepatica. Annales Scientifiques du Limousin 15, 114. Published online in Annales Scientifiques du Naturaliste (2012).Google Scholar
Rondelaud, D., Vignoles, P., Abrous, M. & Dreyfuss, G. (2001) The definitive and intermediate hosts of Fasciola hepatica in the natural watercress beds in central France. Parasitology Research 87, 475478.Google ScholarPubMed
Rondelaud, D., Fousi, M., Vignoles, P., Moncef, M. & Dreyfuss, G. (2007) Optimization of metacercarial production for three digenean species by the use of Petri dishes for raising lettuce-fed Galba truncatula. Parasitology Research 100, 861865.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sanabria, R., Mouzet, R., Courtioux, B., Vignoles, P., Rondelaud, D., Dreyfuss, G., Cabaret, J. & Romero, J. (2012) Intermediate snail hosts of French Fasciola hepatica: Lymnaea neotropica and Lymnaea viatrix are better hosts than local Galba truncatula. Parasitology Research 111, 20112016.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Szmidt-Adjidé, V., Rondelaud, D., Dreyfuss, G. & Cabaret, J. (1996) The effect of parasitism by Fasciola hepatica and Muellerius capillaris on the nerve ganglia of Lymnaea truncatula. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology 67, 300305.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Taylor, E.L. (1965) Fascioliasis and the liver-fluke. 235 pp. FAO Agricultural Studies, no. 64. Rome, FAO.Google Scholar
Torgerson, P. & Claxton, J. (1999) Epidemiology and control. pp. 113149in Dalton, J.P. (Ed.) Fasciolosis. Wallingford, Oxon, CABI Publishing.Google Scholar
Vareille-Morel, C., Dreyfuss, G. & Rondelaud, D. (1999) The characteristics of habitats colonized by three species of Lymnaea in swampy meadows on acid soil: their interest for fasciolosis control. Annales de Limnologie-International Journal for Limnology 35, 173178.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vignoles, P., Dreyfuss, G. & Rondelaud, D. (2002) Redial growth and cercarial productivity of Fasciola hepatica in three species of young lymnaeid snails. Journal of Helminthology 76, 269272.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Vignoles, P., Rondelaud, D. & Dreyfuss, G. (2003) A first infection of Galba truncatula with Fasciola hepatica modifies the prevalence of a subsequent infection and cercarial production in the F1 generation. Parasitology Research 91, 349352.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Vignoles, P., Novobilský, A., Höglund, J., Kašný, M., Pankrác, J., Dreyfuss, G., Pointier, J.P. & Rondelaud, R. (2014) Lymnaea cubensis (Pfeiffer, 1839), an experimental intermediate host for Fascioloides magna. Folia Parasitologica, in press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Lymnaea glabra: progressive increase in susceptibility to Fasciola hepatica through successive generations of experimentally infected snails
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Lymnaea glabra: progressive increase in susceptibility to Fasciola hepatica through successive generations of experimentally infected snails
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Lymnaea glabra: progressive increase in susceptibility to Fasciola hepatica through successive generations of experimentally infected snails
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *