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Torque-coupling and particle–turbulence interactions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 February 2012

Helge I. Andersson
Affiliation:
Department of Energy and Process Engineering, The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway
Lihao Zhao
Affiliation:
Department of Energy and Process Engineering, The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway
Mustafa Barri
Affiliation:
Department of Energy and Process Engineering, The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

A novel scheme for strong coupling between inertial Lagrangian point particles and a continuous Eulerian fluid phase has been developed. A full mechanical coupling can only be achieved if torque-coupling is applied along with the more conventional force-coupling. The torque vector acting from the particles on the fluid is expressed in terms of a new antisymmetric particle stress tensor which adds to the Stokes stress tensor. A strongly-coupled simulation of a turbulent channel flow laden with prolate spheroidal particles with aspect ratio 5:1 demonstrated that the inclusion of torque-coupling reduced the modulation of the turbulent flow field observed in a two-way force-coupled simulation. The spin and orientation of the spheroids were significantly affected.

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Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012

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