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Streamwise inclination angle of large wall-attached structures in turbulent boundary layers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 September 2019

Rahul Deshpande
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
Jason P. Monty
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
Ivan Marusic
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

The streamwise inclination angle of large wall-attached structures, in the log region of a canonical turbulent boundary layer, is estimated via spectral coherence analysis, and is found to be approximately $45^{\circ }$ . This is consistent with assumptions used in prior attached eddy model-based simulations. Given that the inclination angle obtained via standard two-point correlations is influenced by the range of scales in the turbulent flow (Marusic, Phys. Fluids, vol. 13 (3), 2001, pp. 735–743), the present result is obtained by isolating the large wall-attached structures from the rest of the turbulence. This is achieved by introducing a spanwise offset between two hot-wire probes, synchronously measuring the streamwise velocity at a near-wall and log-region reference location, to assess the wall coherence. The methodology is shown to be effective by applying it to data sets across Reynolds numbers, $Re_{\unicode[STIX]{x1D70F}}\sim O(10^{3})$ $O(10^{6})$ .

Type
JFM Rapids
Copyright
© 2019 Cambridge University Press 

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