Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5cfd469876-4h525 Total loading time: 0.418 Render date: 2021-06-23T16:23:35.646Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Improved scaling laws for the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 August 2019

Edward P. DeMauro
Affiliation:
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 98 Brett Road, Room D102, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA
Justin L. Wagner
Affiliation:
Sandia National Laboratories, Engineering Sciences Center, P.O. Box 5800, MS-0825, Albuquerque, NM 87185, USA
Lawrence J. DeChant
Affiliation:
Sandia National Laboratories, Engineering Sciences Center, P.O. Box 5800, MS-0825, Albuquerque, NM 87185, USA
Steven J. Beresh
Affiliation:
Sandia National Laboratories, Engineering Sciences Center, P.O. Box 5800, MS-0825, Albuquerque, NM 87185, USA
Aaron M. Turpin
Affiliation:
North Carolina State University, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA
Corresponding

Abstract

Experiments were performed within Sandia National Labs’ Multiphase Shock Tube to measure and quantify the shock-induced dispersal of a shock/dense particle curtain interaction. Following interaction with a planar travelling shock wave, schlieren imaging at 75 kHz was used to track the upstream and downstream edges of the curtain. Data were obtained for two particle diameter ranges ( $d_{p}=106{-}125$ , $300{-}355~\unicode[STIX]{x03BC}\text{m}$ ) across Mach numbers ranging from 1.24 to 2.02. Using these data, along with data compiled from the literature, the dispersion of a dense curtain was studied for multiple Mach numbers (1.2–2.6), particle sizes ( $100{-}1000~\unicode[STIX]{x03BC}\text{m}$ ) and volume fractions (9–32 %). Data were non-dimensionalized according to two different scaling methods found within the literature, with time scales defined based on either particle propagation time or pressure ratio across a reflected shock. The data show that spreading of the particle curtain is a function of the volume fraction, with the effectiveness of each time scale based on the proximity of a given curtain’s volume fraction to the dilute mixture regime. It is seen that volume fraction corrections applied to a traditional particle propagation time scale result in the best collapse of the data between the two time scales tested here. In addition, a constant-thickness regime has been identified, which has not been noted within previous literature.

Type
JFM Papers
Copyright
© 2019 Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Akiki, G., Jackson, T. L. & Balachandar, S. 2017 Pairwise interaction extended point-particle model for a random array of monodisperse spheres. J. Fluid Mech. 813, 882928.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boiko, V. M., Kiselev, V. P., Kiselev, S. P., Papyrin, A. N., Poplavsky, S. V. & Formin, V. M. 1997 Shock wave interaction with a cloud of particles. Shock Waves 7, 275285.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chang, E. J. & Kailasanath, K. 2003 Shock wave interactions with particles and liquid fuel droplets. Shock Waves 12, 333341.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Davis, S. L., Dittmann, T. B., Jacobs, G. B. & Don, W. S. 2013 Dispersion of a cloud of particles by a moving shock: effects of the shape, angle of rotation, and aspect ratio. J. Appl. Mech. Tech. Phys. 54 (4), 900912.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
DeMauro, E. P., Wagner, J. L., Beresh, S. J. & Farias, P. A. 2017 Unsteady drag following shock wave impingement on a particle curtain measured using pulse-burst PIV. Phys. Rev. Fluids 2, 064301.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goetsch, R. J. & Regele, J. D. 2015 Discrete element method prediction of particle curtain properties. Chem. Engng Sci. 137, 852861.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Houim, R. W. & Oran, E. S. 2016 A multiphase model for compressible granular-gaseous flows: formulation and initial tests. J. Fluid Mech. 789, 166220.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kellenberger, M., Johansen, C., Ciccarelli, G. & Zhang, F. 2013 Dense particle cloud dispersion by a shock wave. Shock Waves 23 (5), 415430.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kosinski, P. 2008 Numerical investigation of explosion suppression by inert particles in straight ducts. J. Hazard. Mater. 154, 981991.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ling, Y., Wagner, J. L., Beresh, S. J., Kearney, S. P. & Balachandar, S. 2012 Interaction of a planar shock wave with a dense particle curtain: modeling and experiments. Phys. Fluids 24, 113301.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lv, H., Wang, Z., Zhang, Y. & Li, J. 2018 Shock attenuation by densely packed micro-particle wall. Exp. Fluids 59, 140148.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McFarland, J. A., Black, W. J., Dahal, J. & Morgan, B. E. 2016 Computational study of the shock driven instability of a multiphase particle-gas system. Phys. Fluids 28, 024105.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Merzkirch, W. & Bracht, K. 1978 The erosion of dust by a shock wave in air: initial stages with laminar flow. Intl J. Multiphase Flow 41 (1), 8995.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pinker, R. A. & Herbert, M. V. 1967 Pressure loss associated with compressible flow through square-mesh wire gauzes. J. Mech. Engng Sci. 9 (1), 1123.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Regele, J. D., Rabinovitch, J., Colonius, T. & Blanquart, G. 2014 Unsteady effects in dense, high speed, particle laden flows. Multiphase Flow 61, 113.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rogue, X., Rodriguez, G., Haas, J. F. & Saurel, R. 1998 Experimental and numerical investigation of the shock-induced fluidization of a particles bed. Shock Waves 8 (1), 2945.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sen, O., Gaul, N. J., Choi, K. K., Jacobs, G. & Udaykumar, H. S. 2017 Evaluation of kriging based surrogate models constructed from mesoscale computations of shock interaction with particles. J. Comput. Phys. 336, 235260.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sen, O., Gaul, N. J., Choi, K. K., Jacobs, G. & Udaykumar, H. S. 2018 Evaluation of multifidelity surrogate modeling techniques to construct closure laws for drag in shock-particle interactions. J. Comput. Phys. 371, 434451.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sweeney, M. R. & Valentine, G. A. 2017 Impact zone dynamics of dilute mono- and polydisperse jets and their implications for the initial conditions of pyroclastic density currents. Phys. Fluids 29, 093304.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Theofanous, T. G., Mitkin, V. & Chang, C. H. 2016 The dynamics of dense particle clouds subjected to shock waves. Part 1. Experiments and scaling laws. J. Fluid Mech. 792, 658681.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Theofanous, T. G., Mitkin, V. & Chang, C. H. 2018 Shock dispersal of dilute particle clouds. J. Fluid Mech. 841, 732745.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vessiere, B. 2006 Detonations in gas-particle mixtures. J. Propul. Power 22 (6), 12691288.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vorobieff, P., Anderson, M., Conroy, J., White, R., Truman, C. R. & Kumar, S. 2011 Vortex formation in a shock-accelerated gas induced by particle seeding. Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 184503.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wagner, J. L., Beresh, S. J., Kearney, S. P., Trott, W. M., Castaneda, J. N., Pruett, B. O. & Baer, M. R. 2012 A multiphase shock tube for shock wave interactions with dense particle fields. Exp. Fluids 52 (6), 15071517.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wagner, J. L., DeMauro, E. P., Casper, K. M., Beresh, S. J., Lynch, K. P. & Pruett, B. O. 2018 Pulse-burst PIV of an impulsively started cylinder in a shock tube for Re > 105 . Exp. Fluids 59 (6), 2, 106–121.Google Scholar
Wagner, J. L., Kearney, S. P., Beresh, S. J., DeMauro, E. P. & Pruett, B. O. 2015 Flash X-ray measurements on the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain. Exp. Fluids 56 (213), 112.Google Scholar
Zhang, F., Frost, D. L., Thibault, P. A. & Murray, S. B. 2001 Explosive dispersal of solid particles. Shock Waves 10, 431443.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Improved scaling laws for the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Improved scaling laws for the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Improved scaling laws for the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *