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Does Process Matter? Direct Democracy and Citizens’ Perceptions of Laws

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 October 2019

Christina Ladam*
Affiliation:
Department of Political Science, University of Nevada Reno, Reno, NV, USA, e-mail: cladam@unr.edu

Abstract

Does the process used to pass a law affect the way citizens evaluate the outcome? In a series of experiments, I manipulate the way in which a law is passed – ballot initiative or the legislative process – to test the effect of process on citizens’ evaluations of policy outcomes. The results show that people view the ballot initiative process as fairer than the legislative process, but that process has a negligible effect on outcome evaluations.

Type
Short Report
Copyright
© The Experimental Research Section of the American Political Science Association 2019

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References

Gibson, James L. 1989. Understandings of Justice: Institutional Legitimacy, Procedural Justice, and Political Tolerance. Law and Society Review 23(3): 469–96.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Harbridge, Laurel, Malhotra, Neil and Harrison, Brian F.. 2014. Public Preferences for Bipartisanship in the Policymaking Process. Legislative Studies Quarterly 39(3):327–55.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ladam, Christina. 2019. Replication Data for: Does Process Matter? Direct Democracy and Citizens’ Perceptions of Laws. Harvard Dataverse, V1. doi:10.7910/DVN/UQSZDY.Google Scholar
Lind, E. Allan and Tyler, Tom R.. 1988. The Social Psychology of Procedural Justice. New York: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tyler, Tom R. 2000. Social Justice: Outcome and Procedure. International Journal of Psychology 35(2): 117–25.Google Scholar
Obergefell v. Hodges. 576 U.S. ____________. 2015.Google Scholar
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