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U.S.Regional Growth And Convergence, 1880–1980

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 March 2009

Abstract

State personal income per capita estimates at six census years are adjusted for state differences in prices and labor input per capita. Decomposition of the variation in state nominal income levels into the contributions of prices, demography, and (residual) labor productivity reveals considerable diversity in the relative importance of each by region and period. Convergence rates across the century differ according to the choice of series (nominal income, price-adjusted income, or productivity). The West and the South play crucial roles in regional convergence, but at different times.

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Copyright © The Economic History Association 1999

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